steer a way through

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SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
Many people, students and professionals alike, will, I suspect, take one look at the degree of technical expertise required to master some of the papers (eg, Daniel Isaacson's "Arithmetical truth and hidden higher-order concepts") and flee in terror. But, for anyone prepared to overcome such fears, this collection steers a way through the challenging and fascinating philosophical issues raised by mathematics as well as any other I know.
(Resurrecting the maths; http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk)

Can I say here without changing the meaning "this collection steers a path through", "this collection steers a course through", "this collection steers a route through"?

Thanks.


 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    'Path' and 'course' yes, with virtually no difference. 'Route' is a bit more physical: steering a route is a more vivid or sustained metaphor, not neutral or bleached like the other three.
     
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