steps makes the solution clear

hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
I would like to ask about two sentences. What is the difference between them?

1) These steps makes the solution clear.

2) These steps makes the solution explicit.

Above clear means easy to grasp or see what is being attempted to. What is the difference between clear and explicit here?
 
  • hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    But as above definition of "prominent" is the same as your definition of "clear."
    I did not define "prominent".

    You may wish to consider
    "The water was clear and I could see the bottom of the river."
    "The water was explicit and I could see the bottom of the river."

    Explicit:
    in great detail
    distinctly expressing all that is meant; leaving nothing merely implied or suggested;
    stating fully all that is meant; definite and unreserved in expression.

    I have been explicit in my explanation, but it is not clear to you. ;)
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I did not define "prominent".

    You may wish to consider
    "The water was clear and I could see the bottom of the river."
    "The water was explicit and I could see the bottom of the river."
    I think explicit used about the water is wrong. But that context is already off-topic for our relevant meaning of clear.

    Explicit:
    in great detail
    distinctly expressing all that is meant; leaving nothing merely implied or suggested;
    stating fully all that is meant; definite and unreserved in expression.

    I have been explicit in my explanation, but it is not clear to you. ;)
    Yes it is a good example and makes much sense. But in English there is a style about not repeating the same words such as "walk a walk". Other than the style, what is the difference between:

    I have been explicit in my explanation, but it is not clear to you.
    I have been clear enough in my explanation, but it is not clear to you.


    I think if something is explicit, it is not necessarily clear to someone and vice versa.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Explicit describes having a large amount of detail that is seen/heard, experienced, etc. (or, as I said earlier, that something is prominent.)

    It is a much stronger form of "clear" - it tells you how it is clear.
    Explicit:
    in great detail
    distinctly expressing all that is meant; leaving nothing merely implied or suggested;
    stating fully all that is meant; definite and unreserved in expression.
    WARNING! This film has scenes of explicit violence.:tick:
    WARNING! This film has scenes of clear violence.:cross:
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    By definition, anything that is explicit is clear. Explicit specifically means having been spelt out / stated or done unequivocally, leaving you in no doubt about it.

    But that doesn’t work the other way round. Not everything that is clear (= obvious) is explicit. For example, you may be in no doubt whatsoever that your partner is angry with you, even if they have not explicitly said they are, or maybe even denied it altogether. It is clear to you because it is implicit in their behaviour.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    By definition, anything that is explicit is clear. Explicit specifically means having been spelt out / stated or done unequivocally, leaving you in no doubt about it.

    But that doesn’t work the other way round. Not everything that is clear (= obvious) is explicit. For example, you may be in no doubt whatsoever that your partner is angry with you, even if they have not explicitly said they are, or maybe even denied it altogether. It is clear to you because it is implicit in their behaviour.
    In this case is he or she showing their emotions, here angriness? Can showing an emotion be both implicit and explicit?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Good question. I suppose it can, but in practice I don’t think the word “explicit” is normally used to describe body language as such — perhaps because of its other very specific usage, with regard to the direct portrayal of sex in films, etc.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Can we say that explicit means very clear?
    Please understand: the difference is in the amount of detail: A statement can be clear without details or where there is no emphasis:
    Explicit describes having a large amount of detail that is seen/heard, experienced, etc. (or, as I said earlier, that something is prominent.)
     
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