stereotype has been replaced

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supermarioutd

Senior Member
Persian
Hello to all,

Can I say the "stereotype" of something has been "replaced" by something else?

Does this make sense to you? :

For a lot of women, the stereotype of a homemaker staying at home raising children has been replaced by a career-oriented woman.

IF this doesn't work, how can I express the idea smoothly?
 
  • guitarist41

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I would say "For a lot of women, the stereotypical role of a homemaker staying at home raising children has been replaced by the role of a career-oriented woman."

    In your sentence, it sounds like a career-oriented woman is the new stereotype.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    There is nothing wrong with one stereotype being replaced with another, but your sentence probably does not have the meaning you intend.

    In the original sentence, it appears that you are describing the stereotypical homemaker, as understood be a lot of women. What I think you say you want to describe is that for everyone, the stereotype of a woman has changed from being a homemaker.

    Even this is not quite right, and what you may mean is that the stereotype of a woman being a homemaker no longer reflects the life of most women today, although I expect as a stereotype it is still widespread. This is the problem with stereotypes. They are not what some people within a group actually do, but how the entire group is perceived by people in general, and they may continue to exist as stereotypes long after they have disappeared in real life. For example, I am pretty sure that very few Frenchmen these days actually wear striped jerseys and berets and ride around on bicycles selling onions, yet this stereotype of the French still exists in Britain today.
    30810
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    There is nothing wrong with one stereotype being replaced with another, but your sentence probably does not have the meaning you intend.

    In the original sentence, it appears that you are describing the stereotypical homemaker, as understood be a lot of women. What I think you say you want to describe is that for everyone, the stereotype of a woman has changed from being a homemaker.

    Even this is not quite right, and what you may mean is that the stereotype of a woman being a homemaker no longer reflects the life of most women today, although I expect as a stereotype it is still widespread. This is the problem with stereotypes. They are not what some people within a group actually do, but how the entire group is perceived by people in general, and they may continue to exist as stereotypes long after they have disappeared in real life. For example, I am pretty sure that very few Frenchmen these days actually wear striped jerseys and berets and ride around on bicycles selling onions, yet this stereotype of the French still exists in Britain today.
    View attachment 30810
    Thanks a lot.

    How would you express the idea that I am trying to convey?
     
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