stick his submarine where it hurts

lekal

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,
Here is a news report,

A British diver involved in rescuing a Thai boy’s soccer team from a submerged cave has a low opinion of Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s very public offers of help, telling CNN that Musk “can stick his submarine where it hurts.”

Musk’s proposal to rescue the team with a small submarine “just had absolutely no chance of working,” said diver Vern Unsworth, who played a major role in the rescue. “[Musk] had no conception of what the cave passage was like. The submarine, I believe, was about 5 foot 6 long, rigid, so it wouldn’t have gone round corners or round any obstacles.

I want to know what " can stick his submarine where it hurts " mean.

Thank you!
 
  • Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    SwissPete has explained it perfectly.

    In BrE, the normal version would actually be very crude, which is why the speaker used a euphemism.

    The phrase would normally be:
    He can stick/shove his submarine [or whatever the item is] up his arse*! [Ouch! Which is why the euphemism "where it hurts" is used. :)]

    *AmE "ass".
     

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Last edited by a moderator:

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    It is a less vulgar way of saying "He can stick his submarine up his ass." It means that he does not appreciate Musk's offer of his submarine to rescue the boys, and that he thinks it is a cheap publicity stunt on Musk's part. Another euphemism is "He can put/stick his submarine where the sun never shines."
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    Does "where it hurts" carry an implication?
    Yes, it carries the implication of it being inserted into the rear passage, which, naturally, would be a painful thing to do. The idea of all of these - stick it where it hurts / stick it where the sun don't shine, etc. - is that the person being told these things is an irritation, encumbrance, hinderance or in some other way an annoyance to the person speaking, and it's a reasonably emphatic way of saying "this person should go away and leave me/us in peace, and if they suffer some pain I would not be sad".
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well, I imagine it hurts when you stick a submarine up your anus. Really, it is just an insult to the person and an expression of contempt for whatever it is that he is invited to stick where it hurts. I say "just" an insult because of the way Musk responded (which is not a topic for this thread), but it is a very strong insult, about as strong as you can get without making a specific accusation.
     

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Yes, it carries the implication of it being inserted into the rear passage, which, naturally, would be a painful thing to do. The idea of all of these - stick it where it hurts / stick it where the sun don't shine, etc. - is that the person being told these things is an irritation, encumbrance, hinderance or in some other way an annoyance to the person speaking, and it's a reasonably emphatic way of saying "this person should go away and leave me/us in peace, and if they suffer some pain I would not be sad".
    It sounds quite rude to say this. < Topic drift removed. Cagey, moderator >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    Everything depends on context, of course, and tone, but the truth is that in English this isn't particularly rude. < Topic drift removed. Cagey, moderator >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It sounds quite rude to say this.
    It is a very rude expression.
    < Topic drift removed. Cagey, moderator >

    In recent years I've found this vulgar expression and the variations of it, very useful.:rolleyes: I'm just very careful where I say it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
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