sticker lost its adhesive / adhesiveness

Super Saiyan

Senior Member
Cantonese
Hi, let say you have a sticker which you got it ten years ago. Now you take it out and try to stick it on a piece of paper, then it comes off, so you say ‘the sticker has lost its adhesive.’ or ‘the sticker has lost its adhesiveness.’ Which one would you say? Thanks
 
  • Super Saiyan

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Thanks, when describing adhesiveness, do you say ‘the adhesiveness of the sticker is strong/weak’? Like the adhesive tape is weak?
     

    moonbeams

    New Member
    UK
    English
    Thanks, when describing adhesiveness, do you say ‘the adhesiveness of the sticker is strong/weak’? Like the adhesive tape is weak?
    Yes that's correct.

    I would most naturally (but quite informally) say 'the sticker has lost its stick'. It's very sticky/not sticky.
     

    Super Saiyan

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Thanks? Is there a difference between adhesiveness and adhesion? Even after checking the dictionary, I dont have a clue.
     

    Eric Chengdu

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    After some googling, I found "lose its stick/sticky/stickum" and "lose its adhesive/adhesiveness/adhesion" all get many hits. I guess it's about the regional variants. However "lose its adhesive" seems to mean "lose its sticky coating" which is a bit different from what you intended to say.
     

    Super Saiyan

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Yes that's correct.

    I would most naturally (but quite informally) say 'the sticker has lost its stick'. It's very sticky/not sticky.
    ‘The sticker has lost its ‘stick’, I didnt know ‘stick’ can be used this way informally. Coz the noun stick doesnt mean sticky
     

    pachanga7

    Senior Member
    English - US
    ‘The sticker has lost its ‘stick’, I didnt know ‘stick’ can be used this way informally. Coz the noun stick doesnt mean sticky
    I would say this is a cute usage specific to this situation. Otherwise your listeners are likely to misunderstand. That is, “stick” doesn’t usually mean “adhesiveness” but we understand it in this context because of the close association of related words. It’s a bit humorous.

    Is there a difference between adhesiveness and adhesion? Even after checking the dictionary, I dont have a clue.
    Adhesiveness refers to a quantity or quality of having stickiness or being adhesive, that is, the ability of something to stick.

    Ex. The adhesiveness of these bandaids is not affected by moisture. (They might still be in the box, so we are just talking about their qualities or potential for sticking).

    Adhesion is a specific instance of something adhering to something else. I’m not sure why some people would use it to refer to the quality of stickiness—to me it seems like a loose way of speaking.

    Ex. The copper surface is micro roughened to aid adhesion of the next layer.* (Here, it’s not that either surface is inherently adhesive—rather, it’s the act and/or result of adhering being referenced).

    Ex. The students’ adhesion to the rules leaves a lot to be desired. (Adhesion can be used figuratively to mean adherence to principles, respect for or following guidelines or a philosophy).

    Ex. After my operation I had a lot of problems with internal adhesions because of all the scar tissue. (Adhesions can also refer to physical attachments that spring up after trauma to the body’s tissues).

    Hope that helps.

    *a paraphrased quote from atotech.com
     
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