Still up to eat?

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EdwinT

Senior Member
Chinese
In a book that teaches everyday English sentences, there's a conversation that starts with:

Debra: Hey, still up to eat?
Kevin: Sure, where do you wannna eat?

What does "up to" mean here? I understand that "up to doing something" means "strong enough for a particular activity", but here the usage is "up to do something" and I don't quite get its meaning.
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Up to/up for has already been discussed, including: up to/for

    The sentence would have been better written if it read, "up for eating."

    I suspect many people don't make that distinction, however.
     

    MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    up for (something) : willing to do something or interested in doing something

    still up for (something) : the person has previously said they were interested, and asking if they still want to do it / to go.

    Get rid of that book! They're teaching you the worst of American conversational speech. Please - never say 'wanna' and 'gonna'.
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Get rid of that book!
    :thumbsup:
    They're teaching you slang. Learn to understand it when you hear it, but don't use it in your speech.
    (There's nothing morally wrong with slang, but it's hard to understand if you pronounce it with any amount of foreign accent.)
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Speaking of slang, one time I was talking with a young friend and I made a suggestion about something.
    He answered "I'm down with that", and it meant "I'm up for that" or, in standard English, "I agree with that" or "That's okay with me".
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Debra: Hey, still up to eat?
    Kevin: Sure, where do you wannna eat?

    I don't think an AE or BE speaker would say these things.

    "(Are you) still up to eating?" means "Do you have enough energy to eat, or are you too exhausted?"

    "(Are you) still up for eating?" means "Do you still want to eat?"

    And "wanna" is a (common) poor pronunciation of "want to". It is not a new word. It is not everyday speech.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    If I were to say that sentence I would say it like this:

    Hey, you still up for getting something to eat?
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    I want to (!) voice the opinion that "wanna" and "gonna" are not "the worst" or "poor pronunciation"—at the same time as I agree that they are bad spelling.
    Those pronunciations of "want to" and "going to" are typical of ordinary, everyday, unguarded fast speech by speakers of American English of all educational levels.
    What is not typical is writing them in those ways, except in a self-conscious effort to emphasize the colloquial nature of an utterance.
    They are as natural as "I'm" for "I am", with the difference that "I'm" has the privilege of being acceptable in informal writing.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I second Cenzontle. If you're writing dialogue and want to give it some "flavor" to fit a character you can use "wanna" as a more literal transcription of something coming out of their mouth. But in general writing, and even in most character dialogue, you would use the standard spelling "want to". It's the only correct spelling. That doesn't mean it's pronounced exactly like that in every day casual speech.

    Those pronunciations of "want to" and "going to" are typical of ordinary, everyday, unguarded fast speech by speakers of American English of all educational levels.
     
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