Stir concern

nylg85

Senior Member
Chinese
hello everybody

I've tried stir concern on the internet. I got nothing but only news titles I have no idea what does it means.

My guess is that it means stirr up feelings.

thanks in advance
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It seems to simply mean cause concern, or stir up concern — that is, make people worry. I get the impression that it’s a phrase currently in vogue in the US, but probably not elsewhere.
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    We'd need to know the context in which you saw the phrase but I agree it could mean rouse feelings of worry or anxiety.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I've tried stir concern on the internet. I got nothing but only news titles I have no idea what does it means.

    My guess is that it means stirr up feelings.
    Please give us the complete sentence in which the phrase was used, and tell us where you found it.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I've tried stir concern on the internet. I got nothing but only news titles I have no idea what does it means.

    My guess is that it means stirr up feelings.
    As Chez said, your guess may be correct, but we need context to make sure. Where did you see/hear this? Who wrote/said it, and why?


    Cross-posted.
     

    nylg85

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thanks guys for your warm reply.

    Following other contacts I got from the Google search

    Donald Trump’s Orders on Border Wall Stir Concern Over Presidential Power

    Patent Policy Changes Stir Concern

    Sexist Incidents Stir Concern on Canadian Campuses

    Anytime the response time goes up more than a minute, it is cause for concern,'' said First Deputy ...

    I guess the usage was popular during 80s or 90s because some of the context I found above are news archive during that time.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Notice that the examples are things that stir concern, not people - Trump's orders, policy changes, sexist incidents, ... the fourth one doesn't use "stir".
    Notice that they are all headlines. There are some usages that are common in headlines that aren't used much in conversation.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I will note that "stir" is a four-letter word and "cause" is a five-letter word. In headlines, where space is limited, short words are very convenient.

    "Lead to" is seven characters and "generate" is eight.
     
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