sto alla tua parola

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Snowman75, Sep 2, 2006.

  1. Snowman75

    Snowman75 Senior Member

    Sydney, Australia
    Australia (English)
    I think I heard this phrase:

    Sto alla tua parola.

    and from the context it seemed to mean:

    I'll take your word for it.

    Can anyone tell me whether this is correct, and whether this is a common phrase in Italian.

    Grazie in anticipo.
     
  2. cartaplus

    cartaplus Senior Member

    Dubai
    italian
    I believe you
    I believe what you told me
    I believe your words
     
  3. [ITA]Shank Senior Member

    Italiano
    Hi snowman... to be honest I never used and I never heard that form, even, I have to tell it, if someone say it to to me, I can understand what he's meaning for because that phrase sounds really good in italian... maybe the next time I will use it. :)

    The translations gave you Cartaplus are perfect. :)
     
  4. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Your understanding is not wrong at all, but if we want to say I'll take your word for it. we go for credo a quello che dici, ti credo.

    We'd say using a polemic tone: stando alla tua parola when we actually don't believe in what people are telling us and in this situation I'd rather translate it as: according to your words, according to what you're telling me.

    Stando alla tua parola, ieri sera non eri ubriaco....
    According to your word, last night you weren't pissed..were you? (I already know you were pissed or at least I'm almost sure and I want to make you feel guilty because I think you're lying..)
     
  5. Saoul

    Saoul Senior Member

    Spain, Valencia
    Italian
    I agree with Paulfromitaly.

    Credo alle tue parole
    Mi fido delle tue parole

    That's how I would say: "I believe what you say".
     
  6. Snowman75

    Snowman75 Senior Member

    Sydney, Australia
    Australia (English)
    I want to make sure I understand the sense of these phrases correctly.

    In English, the phrase "I'll take your word for it" is normally used in a very particular situation where it has a very particular meaning. I'll try to demonstrate:

    Tom: "You should try sky diving; it's great fun."
    Harry: "I'll take your word for it."

    Here Harry is not really saying "I believe you" - he's saying "I can't argue with you because I have no intention of ever trying sky diving". If he just said "I believe you" he would not be conveying the same message.

    I found a great quote from the movie Robin Hood: Men in Tights

    Little John: "Oh, they call me Little John. But don't let my name fool you. In real life, I'm very big. "
    Robin Hood: "I'll take your word for it. "

    Again, here Robin Hood is not saying "I believe you", he's saying "I have no intention of finding out for myself whether you're actually 'very big'".

    Anyway, I was just wondering whether any of the Italian phrases you've suggested are used in this way.
     
  7. Saoul

    Saoul Senior Member

    Spain, Valencia
    Italian
    Nope, we would use this idiom: "Ti credo sulla parola".
    That "sulla" conveys exactly the same meaning you explained.
     
  8. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    I got you, mate...in this case:

    "I'll take your word for it." means " ti prendo in parola." or "ti credo sulla parola" as Saoul suggested.
     
  9. Snowman75

    Snowman75 Senior Member

    Sydney, Australia
    Australia (English)
    Grazie a tutti, in particolare a Paul e Saoul. Quello è esattamente ciò che volevo sapere.

    (correzioni sono sempre ben accette)
     
  10. Saoul

    Saoul Senior Member

    Spain, Valencia
    Italian
    Your sentence was absolutely correct from a grammar point of view, but this is how and Italian would commonly say it.

    Anyway, your Italian is awesome. Good job.
    Saoul
     
  11. Snowman75

    Snowman75 Senior Member

    Sydney, Australia
    Australia (English)
    Grazie.

    Edit:

    I should return the favour. In your sentence it would be better to use the adjective "grammatical" instead of "grammar".
     
  12. Saoul

    Saoul Senior Member

    Spain, Valencia
    Italian
    Grazie mille.
    I will try to memorize it. :D
     

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