stomach (belly / organ)

elroy

Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
In English the word "stomach" is ambiguous. It can mean either the belly or the organ that is part of the digestive system.

Arabic, Hebrew, and German all have distinct words for these:

belly / organ:
Arabic: بطن / معدة
Hebrew: בטן / קיבה
German: Bauch / Magen

What about other languages?
 
  • סייבר־שד

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    In Mexican Spanish, estómago, like informal panza, can also be used to refer to either the belly or the organ. However, for the former you could also employ vientre, which only means that, "belly".
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Wow, I had no idea "panza" could be used for the organ! The Palestinian Arabic word بنص /bansˤ/, which I've always assumed was a borrowing from "panza," is a childish derogartory term for someone who is overweight or chubby (like "fatso" in English), so I assumed that "panza" specifically meant a protruding belly (a paunch or a "beer belly").

    In Palestinian Arabic:

    معدة /miʕde/ = stomach as an organ
    بطن /batˤen/ = stomach as in abdomen/belly (neutral)
    كرش /karʃ/ = protruding belly / paunch / "beer belly"
    بنص /bansˤ/ = "fatso"

    So I take it "panza" can be used for any of the first three in Mexican Spanish?
     
    Greek:

    Belly: «Κοιλιά» [ci.ˈʎa] (fem.) which is the Classical «κοιλίᾱ» koilíā with synizesis --> abdomen, belly, body cavity in general < Classical adjective «κοῖλος, -λη, -λον» koîlŏs (masc.), koílē (fem.), koîlŏn (neut.) --> hollow.

    Stomach: «Στομάχι» [s̠t̠o̞.ˈma.çi] (neut.) < Byzantine neuter diminutive «στομάχι(ο)ν» stomákhi(o)n < Classical masc. noun «στόμαχος» stómăkʰŏs --> gullet, throat (etymologically speaking, it's from the noun «στόμα» stómă --> mouth (PIE *steh₃-mn- mouth cf. Hit. ištāman- ear, Av. staman- mouth of a dog) + same suffix «-αχος/-αχός» -ăkʰos/-ăkʰós as in «οὐραχός» ourăkʰós --> outer end of the eyebrows, of a stalk; the construction is remarkable with the first part of the word being IE and a suffix being Pre-Greek).

    Protruding belly: «Μπιροκοιλιά» [bi.ɾo̞.ci.ˈʎa] (fem.) --> beer-belly, «πατσοκοιλιά» [pa.t̠͡s̠o̞.ci.ˈʎa] (fem.) --> muffin-top, paunch (the first member is «πατσές» [pa.ˈt̠͡s̠e̞s̠] (fem. nom. pl.) --> (slang) body fat that extends over the edges of the waistline < Turkish paça [pa.ˈt͡ʃa] --> pluck or organ meats of a butchered animal).

    Fatso: «Κοιλαράς» [ci.la.ˈɾas̠] (masc.), «κοιλαρού» [ci.la.ˈɾu] (fem.) which is the augmentative of «κοιλιά» (see above).
     
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    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    belly - panxa
    Which of these three can it be used for?
    معدة /miʕde/ = stomach as an organ
    بطن /batˤen/ = stomach as in abdomen/belly (neutral)
    كرش /karʃ/ = protruding belly / paunch / "beer belly"

    A follow-up to my original question:
    belly / organ:
    Arabic: بطن / معدة
    In Palestinian Arabic, "I have a stomachache" or "My stomach hurts" can be expressed using either one of these, but بطن ("belly") is actually more common. What about other languages?
     
    A follow-up to my original question:

    In Palestinian Arabic, "I have a stomachache" or "My stomach hurts" can be expressed using either one of these, but بطن ("belly") is actually more common. What about other languages?
    «Στομαχόπονος» [s̠t̠o̞.ma.ˈxo̞.po̞.no̞s̠] (masc.) --> stomach-pain (the second member in the compound is «πόνος» [ˈpo̞.no̞s̠] (masc.) --> pain < Classical masc. noun «πόνος» pónŏs --> hard labour, effort, struggle, sorrow, as second member in compounds, ending pain, o-grade deverbative from the deponent v. «πένομαι» pénŏmai --> to exert oneself, toil, work, prepare, provide, do hard labour (PIE *(s)penh₁- to stretch, strain cf. Lith. pinti, to weave, braid, Proto-Germanic *spinnaną. Greek has undergone a semantic shift from to stretch > to exert oneself)).

    «Κοιλόπονος» [ci.ˈlo̞.po̞.no̞s̠] (masc.) --> belly-pain.

    In medical jargon they're:

    (1) «Στομαχικό άλγος» [s̠t̠o̞.ma.çi.ˈko̞.ˈal.ɣo̞s̠] (both neuter) --> stomachal ache (MoGr «άλγος» [ˈal.ɣo̞s̠] (neut.) --> ache < Classical neut. noun «ἄλγος» ắlgŏs (idem), possibly an o-grade deverbative from the v. «ἀλέγω» ălégō --> to care for, mind, heed (PIE *h₂leg- to care for, mind).

    (2) «Κοιλιακό άλγος» [ci.li.a.ˈko̞.ˈal.ɣo̞s̠] (both neuter) --> abdominal ache.
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    In Italian we have:

    pancia (informal for belly. The formal words for it are 'ventre' or 'addome'. Cf. English venter, abdomen).Pron.pàntcha

    stomaco (the organ, Magen in German). Stress on o (open).

    Ho mal di pancia = my belly aches/hurts
    Ho mal di stomaco = my stomach aches/hurts

    Figuratively:
    - non ha avuto lo stomaco di farlo = he didn't have the courage (the 'nerve') to do it.
    - quell'uomo ha del pelo sullo stomaco (lit. that man has hairs on his stomach) = that man fears nothing/that's a tough man.
     
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    amikama

    a mi modo
    עברית
    In Palestinian Arabic, "I have a stomachache" or "My stomach hurts" can be expressed using either one of these, but بطن ("belly") is actually more common. What about other languages?
    Only בטן (belly) is used to describe pains.
    יש לי כאבי בטן
    כואבת לי הבטן

    If you say יש לי כאבים בקיבה or כואבת לי הקיבה, you literally mean that you feel pains in this specific organ, not in your belly in general.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French, as a primary meaning:
    ventre = belly
    estomac = stomach


    But in some expressions, one can be used instead of the other, for example:
    ventre affamé n'a pas d'oreille (lit. a hungry belly has no ear) = anyone who is hungry cannot be reasoned
    un coup de poing à l'estomac
    (lit. a punch in the stomach) = a sudden and painful event

    Similarly to Spanish and Italian, we also have the informal panse, which can play both roles, depending on the context.
    (the name originally comes from the main part of ruminants digestive system, called in English paunch or rumen)
     
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    Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Just to be sure, what do you mean by "belly"?

    Do you mean the abdomen (the lower part of the torso) as opposed to just the stomach?

    Finnish has the terms vatsa and maha. Either can refer to the stomach or the whole abdomen, although I think that in technical contexts, vatsa tends to mean "abdomen".

    A more specific, unambiguous term for "stomach" is mahalaukku ("stomach-bag").

    maha is from the same source as German Magen, Icelandic magi, etc. "stomach, belly", whereas vatsa is said to be of Finno-Ugric origin.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Can anyone use the equivalent as, literally, 'the stomach of a country' (probably in better English, 'its heartland')? Because that is one of the ways in Cymraeg/Welsh of describing 'the inner part of a country' (especially, if it is isolated) as well as the stomach or belly.

    There are also other words for the last two, and regional/dialectical versions between Northern Welsh, Southern Welsh and Western Welsh.
     

    Ansku89

    Member
    Finnish
    Finnish has the terms vatsa and maha. Either can refer to the stomach or the whole abdomen, although I think that in technical contexts, vatsa tends to mean "abdomen".

    A more specific, unambiguous term for "stomach" is mahalaukku ("stomach-bag").
    Yes, in medical text vatsa=abdomen and maha=mahalaukku=stomach. In everyday speech vatsa and maha are used as synonyms. Some people even use "vatsalaukku" but that is definitely wrong. Personally I prefer to use only vatsa and mahalaukku and avoid maha to be more clear.
     

    סייבר־שד

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    Wow, I had no idea "panza" could be used for the organ! The Palestinian Arabic word بنص /bansˤ/, which I've always assumed was a borrowing from "panza," is a childish derogartory term for someone who is overweight or chubby (like "fatso" in English), so I assumed that "panza" specifically meant a protruding belly (a paunch or a "beer belly").

    In Palestinian Arabic:

    معدة /miʕde/ = stomach as an organ
    بطن /batˤen/ = stomach as in abdomen/belly (neutral)
    كرش /karʃ/ = protruding belly / paunch / "beer belly"
    بنص /bansˤ/ = "fatso"

    So I take it "panza" can be used for any of the first three in Mexican Spanish?
    It could indeed be used for those three, yes, but it definitely remains an informal term, sometimes also childish, and it has a more widespread currency in the third sense, with the first being perhaps the least common, and usually limited to a couple of more or less fixed expressions.

    I didn't know that Palestinian Arabic term :p, perhaps it entered via French panse?
     
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