stoop vs slouch

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GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Hello, everyone,
I know those two verbs are not the same, but I would like to ask you a question about the difference between them. According to OALD and Macmillan Dictionary "slouch - walk, sit, stand with your shoulders and head bent forward" and "sloop - bend the top part of your body forwards. And 2 - walk or stand with your shoulders bent forwards and downwards". And there are a few sentences: "She stooped and kissed the children." - in this sentence stoop looks similar to "bend down" to me. I think that when we bend down, our lower body and our upper body take part in the movement. When we stoop we only move our shoulders (upper body). Is that true?

- stoop and slouch look similar to me in this sense "walk or stand with your shoulders bent forward and downwards" as in "He's tall but he has a tendency to stoop." Here, they look similar to me. I know they are different, but I can't see clearly the difference. I just think that stoop describes his posture, whereas if someone slouches somewhere, he usually moves (stand/sit are also options).



The first sentence is provided by OALD and the sentence containing "stoop" by Macmillan Dictionary. Thank you!
 
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  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Generally speaking, a slouch has to do with being overly relaxed, not holding yourself up properly. Slouching is a result of poor posture. You can slouch in a chair as well as while standing so movement is not the difference. Stooping is something you might do on purpose.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Generally speaking, a slouch has to do with being overly relaxed, not holding yourself up properly. Slouching is a result of poor posture. You can slouch in a chair as well as while standing so movement is not the difference. Stooping is something you might do on purpose.
    Hello, Myridon. I think I know what you mean. Both OALD and Macmillan define slouch as "to sit, walk or stand with your shoulders bent forward and your head low, so that you look lazy". If you are very tall and you want to get through a doorway you might have to stoop, is that right? Also, when someone is writing they can slouch. At least I think so. Bend their upper body too far forward so that their face/head is very close to the sheet of paper/notebook.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, if you were very tall you might have to stoop to get through a doorway; you would not use "slouch" in these circumstances.
    When writing, you can slouch:thumbsup:, whereas writing and stooping don't go together.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Yes, if you were very tall you might have to stoop to get through a doorway; you would not use "slouch" in these circumstances.
    When writing, you can slouch:thumbsup:, whereas writing and stooping don't go together.

    Thank you, sound shift. I am probably wrong, but I think that when people stoop they are usually in an upright position.
    OALD's example "Several students were slouching against the wall." I think their are leaning against the wall, their shoulders drooping and heads relaxed/low. That makes them look lazy. I would not use stoop in this sentence. It seems to be more deliberate/intentional, as Myridon has pointed out.
     
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