Stop it you

jackie05

New Member
Greek
Hello! What's a playful way to say to someone, "stop it you" in Russian? I used to know three different ones, but I can't seem to remember any now.
Thank you.
 
  • Kalaus

    Member
    Russian, Russia
    Here's a couple good ones for you:

    - Ах, оставьте!
    - Ну, полноте, будет вам!

    Both sound a bit archaic and therefore ironic/playful.
     

    Boris Tatarenko

    Senior Member
    Here's a couple good ones for you:

    - Ах, оставьте!
    - Ну, полноте, будет вам!

    Both sound a bit archaic and therefore ironic/playful.
    If you don't want to have any Russian friends, sure, go ahead and use those...

    Прекрати, хватит, перестань are quite common.

    I'd say "хватит" as it's the shortest one.
     

    Boris Tatarenko

    Senior Member
    No offence but what you suggested in post #5 sounds really odd. At least it definately would if someone of my age (and of my parents' age... and my grandparents'...) said something like this. Such "florid" expressions are not common, let alone playful. They might be found solely in 19th century books.

    I can't imagine anyone in their right mind saying something like this unless the person is either a character of a Tolstoy's book, or an actor whose playing that character. o_O

    what's so playful about "Прекрати, хватит, перестань"?
    In my humble (not really) opinion, what really makes those expressions "playful" is your voice, timbre and tone.
     

    Kalaus

    Member
    Russian, Russia
    I can't imagine anyone in their right mind saying something like this unless the person is either a character of a Tolstoy's book, or an actor whose playing that character. o_O
    Exactly. That's what the thing called irony is about. I use them all the time to respond, e. g., to expressions of thanks or compliments. No one ever gave me a strange look, like I'm a time traveler. Anyone who ever read a book from the XIX century recognizes it as a joke.

    In my humble (not really) opinion, what really makes those expressions "playful" is your voice, timbre and tone.
    True, but intonation and voice melody doesn't transmit well in writing.
     

    Boris Tatarenko

    Senior Member
    Exactly. That's what the thing called irony is about. I use them all the time to respond, e. g., to expressions of thanks or compliments. No one ever gave me a strange look, like I'm a time traveler. Anyone who ever read a book from the XIX century recognizes it as a joke.
    In this case (I mean irony) I wouldn't give you a weird look either. ;)
     
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