stop on by?

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milanforart

Member
Chinese
"She made the pastry dough and thought she ought to tell Ella and John to stop on by her because three pies, maybe four, were too much to keep one's own." ----from Beloved.

Hi, everyone, I know the meanings of both "stop by" and "stop on", and am wondering what "stop on by" indicates in the above sentence? Thank you!
 
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  • Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    You know the meaning of "stop on"? I didn't know there was one!
    This is basically just "stop by". The 'on' is a kind of filler that you can imagine as being part of "come on".
    So I would say that "stop on by" means "come on and stop by".

    Your out should be ought.
     

    milanforart

    Member
    Chinese
    Thank you Edinburgher for the reminder and the answer.

    Maybe I should have said that I knew it means "stop by" in general, but wanted to know why it was put that way, as I couldn't see any good reason in it, except that simply one more word was added to a phrase. I looked it up in a dictionary before posting and got the meaning of "stop on".
    Here's the link -- http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/stop-on
     
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