stopczyć

cześć,

I am looking for thw word footsie in polish but non of my friends can help me with that, it is like Füßeln in German or hacer piececitos in spanish, so I came up with stopa as stopczyć

I would like to know your feedback,:)

dzięki
 
  • lukis421

    Senior Member
    Polish - Poland
    If you mean it in the context of "to play footsie" (or footsies?) I'd say "stópczyć się". (From stópka - little foot)

    For example:
    Bezwstydnie stópczyli się pod stołem.

    Stopczyć with an o in the middle makes me think of words like stopić (melt) or stop (alloy).

    This is, however, completely subjective.
     
    Dziękuję bardzo za odpowiedź

    now I am as a learner of polish language the proud inventer of a new word in polish,

    stópczyć się

    I will claim it at Adam Mickiewicz institut for myself;)

    ra na
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I am looking for thw word footsie in polish but non of my friends can help me with that, it is like Füßeln in German or hacer piececitos in spanish, so I came up with stopa as stopczyć

    I would like to know your feedback,:)
    Do you mean that this is your proposal for a new word in Polish?
    Do you think that there is a need for this? If there was the need somebody would have found a word for it. Polish writer Tadeusz "Boy" Żeleński, a great satirist, wrote a poem on the very subject more than 100 years ago: "Pieśń o mowie naszej", but even he did not bother to create a new word.
    Besides, the word stopa i seldom used in colloquial speech in Polish. It is used mostly in medical contexts, or in idioms like "stopa procentowa", "stopa życiowa".
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    The word 'footsie' with the dimunitive ending -sie seems to be a neologism associated with baby talk.
    The polish counterpart of foot is stopa. So the dimunitive could be stopusia, in the plural stopusie.
    Toes - palce (u nogi), tootsies - paluszki, palusie ....
    Bootie - bucik (I used to call bucik - butko, when I was three.)

    I guess you meant 'play footsie.'
    Maybe, in Polish, one could say "flirtować paluszkami (u nóg pod stołem)"?
    I have never heard of stopusiować, stopeczkować, stopkować or paluszkować. They are obvious neologisms but they sound a bit cute, especially when one says it in sweet/funny way.
    They are much better than 'stópczyć'.
    'Stópczyć' sounds like 'gzić' which has a pejorative meaning: to have it off.
     
    Last edited:
    wordreference says it should be stopka but google translater give stópka for that, but I think stópczyć sounds better than stopczyć.
    I see it is not the best word to be used and even my polish friends here tells me off for the odd sound of that but I like to play with words and also to be odd.:)

    never the less thanks for all your feedbacks
     
    Last edited:

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    The established diminutive of "stopa" in Polish is "stópka" or "stopka".
    For me, stópka sounds like pupka (bummy). It sounds a bit odd. Doroszewski gives an example of an expression with stópki: "Ścielę się pod stópki, pani dobrodziejce." It is a playful and outdated form of greeting.
    Stopka (a small foot) sounds better. Stopka is, by the way, a part of a sewing machine.
     

    jasio

    Senior Member
    For me, stópka sounds like pupka (bummy). It sounds a bit odd. Doroszewski gives an example of an expression with stópki: "Ścielę się pod stópki, pani dobrodziejce." It is a playful and outdated form of greeting.
    The greeting is indeed outdated, but it does not mean that the word itself is outdated as well.
    Stopka is, by the way, a part of a sewing machine.
    And has several other meanings as well. But it does not mean that it's the same with the "small foot" meaning. Compare "oczy" vs. "oka".
    Compare:
    To make a long story short, in several meanings, "stopka" is the only correct version, in "small foot" meaning both are correct, and there's also a meaning in which "stópka" is the only choice.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Dorosły człowiek ma stopę, ale małe, raczkujące dziecko ma stópkę.
    Anyway both stopczyć ans stópczyć sounds very strange and awkward when all you want to say is dotykać się stopami (play footsie).
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    For me, stópka sounds like pupka (bummy). It sounds a bit odd. Doroszewski gives an example of an expression with stópki: "Ścielę się pod stópki, pani dobrodziejce." It is a playful and outdated form of greeting.
    Stopka (a small foot) sounds better. Stopka is, by the way, a part of a sewing machine.
    Exactly, these two pronunciations give different meaning to the word. "Stopka" can be part of a machine, but "stópka" can't.
     
    I did ask my polish friends :

    dotykać się stopami


    and they started to rob their own foots together without any sexuall effect.

    also I will stick to my own word:)
     

    haes

    Member
    Polish - Poland
    Pieścić stopami (to caress with feet) sounds much more appropriate, but it will have strong, very strong sexual background. Or maybe not sexual but erotic, which is different. I could imagine 2 lovers caressing each others feet or by feet, but I would never say it for 2 teens that do not know each other better than school friends etc.

    Just forget the word "stópczyć", this is weirdest thing I could imagine in Polish. Nah, I would not even imagine this, to me it has close to repulsive hue. Maybe could be used in some word puzzle games with strong discussion what it means but... nah, just forget it.
     

    yezyk

    Member
    Polish
    Yeah, "stópczyć", even as a neologism, sounds awful :D Not least because it rhymes with (vulgar) d...ć : P And there is no way it would not be interpreted sexually.
    "Dotykać się stopami" is a literal description of the action, which does not suggest sexual activity in itself.
    "Pieścić się stopami" sounds very natural, and would be appropriate for erotic contexts.
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    This sounds incredibly creepy, weird, odd, ughhhh, something like "dupczyć" which is "to cornhole". Extremely cringy I would say, don't use it please. And it just makes no sense, what for?.
    Indeed. NEVER!!!!!! EVER!!!!!! use it. It doesn't make ANY!!!!!! sense to me.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top