Storm = Thunderstorm in A.E.??

  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    A thunderstorm is a storm that has thunder.

    However, storms without thunder (including storms of rain, snow, hail, or wind) are still storms.

    American speakers of English are fully aware that there are other kinds of storms besides thunderstorms.

    Why would anyone think that the only kinds of storms that occur in the US are thunderstorms, or that Americans have no word to describe other kinds of weather, reserving the word "storm" for "thunderstorms"? This idea is not only false, but without any rational foundation.
     

    xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    My German is pretty bad--does that article say Americans don't use "thunderstorm" because it's too complicated?
    I'm with GWB: that's both untrue and pretty silly.
     

    Old Novice

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    It is true that we may say simply "storm" when it actually is a thunderstorm. Possibly in German one always specifies which kind of storm it is? That would explain why it would be useful to note in the blog that our practice is different.
     

    Rational_gaze

    Senior Member
    British English
    In British English the addition of thunder to a storm makes a thunderstorm, just like in American English.

    I'm sure a speaker of either might often say 'storm' when describing a thunderstorm, like someone might say 'car' when describing a sports car. It is just less specific.
     
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    GuWu

    Member
    German
    My German is pretty bad--does that article say Americans don't use "thunderstorm" because it's too complicated?
    I'm with GWB: that's both untrue and pretty silly.
    Yes, it says that thunderstorm was too complicated and you use "gale" or "high winds" for the german word "Sturm".
     

    xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    Yes, it says that thunderstorm was too complicated and you use "gale" or "high winds" for the german word "Sturm".
    The more accurate explanation is simply that "storm" is any kind of meteorological disturbance; it could could involve high winds, or not. Terms like "thunderstorm" and "snowstorm" specify in what way the atmosphere was disturbed--in what way the storm was notable. They're still types of storms, as are gales.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I read the blog and it's just simple ignorance that could have been avoided with a 30-second Google search (if the writer can read English)
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    In the US, we have hailstorms, thunderstorms, snowstorms, rainstorms and probably some other kind of storms too. Maybe some of these are spelled as two separate words??? Anyway, they are all storms.
     
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