straight A's

bongbang

Senior Member
Thai
Quel est l'équivalent français ? Exemple:

My parents promise to buy me a bike if I get straight A's this semester.
 
  • Jean-Michel Carrère

    Senior Member
    French from France
    if I get straight 'A's this semester : si je n'obtiens que des 'A' ce semestre

    Note : In France, marks are expressed in figures out of 20 (e.g. the equivalent of an A would be, say, 16 +), not in the form of letters, but someone from France who is familiar with your system would understand what you mean.
     

    bongbang

    Senior Member
    Thai
    Ah, you use the metric system over there ;)

    Thanks, Jean-Michel. Just to be sure, no s after "A" in "que des A ce semestre", correct ?

    And out of curiosity, what would be the French equivalent of "straight-A student" ?
     

    geve

    Senior Member
    France, French
    Hello Bongbang !

    Well it depends, Jean-Michel : at école primaire you can get marks out of 10, or even A-B-C-D-E... or at least, it was so in the 80's !

    No S indeed. A "straight-A student", hum, does it really exist in France ??
    It could be un élève brillant... le premier de la classe... un petit génie, une grosse tête, un champion... le chouchou de la maîtresse :D (the teacher's pet)
     

    judkinsc

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Maybe the natives have something. They don't really understand the idea of a GPA in the French system, though. It's all based on test grades, particularly the baccalaureat for university admissions. Once you pass that (assuming you do pass it, I think it's around 70% now), you're allowed admissions into any French university that you want to go to. There's a different class of school, called les grandes écoles or les écoles nationales, which have stricter entrance policies, and I'm not certain what all of those requirements are. I have heard that preparatory schools are fairly common for those.

    Corrigez-moi si je me suis trompé.
     

    geve

    Senior Member
    France, French
    You're right Chad, I had to look for the definition of "GPA" ! (for the record : here)
    Your understanding of the French system seems accurate. To enter grandes écoles you might need a certain mention at the baccalauréat : mention "assez bien" (>12/20), "bien" (>14/20), "très bien" (>16/20) ; and "passable" > 10/20, means you passed

    However, from Bongbang's original sentence (my parents promise to buy me a bike), I rather thought the person speaking was a child.
    If that is so, I think the most likely to be heard in France in an equivalent situation, would be "si j'ai des bonnes notes", or stronger : "si je n'ai que des bonnes notes" - of course, it's more subjective, since it all depends on what marks the parents judge "good" or "not good"...

    PS: mais si, c'est possible d'avoir 20/20 !! (dictée, en 6è :cool: :D )
     

    pieanne

    Senior Member
    Belgium/French
    Nowadays, in the primary schools, you have TB (très bien bravo), B (bien), AB (assez bien), M (moyen), I (insuffisant) and TI (très insuffisant).
     

    Isotta

    Senior Member
    English, Hodgepodge
    At exchange programs between American and French universities around a 14 is often accepted as an "A," but I don't know if that means they have taken into account the cultural adjustment factor.

    Z.
     

    geve

    Senior Member
    France, French
    bongbang said:
    Félicitations ! Est-ce que vous avez gagné un vélo ? :)
    Si je me souviens bien... j'ai dû gagner l'admiration de mes pairs et les félicitations de ma famille... C'est déjà pas mal, non ? :rolleyes:

    J'espère que nous avons répondu à vos questions !
     
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