straight from the horse's ***

32000BTUGasGrill

Member
English - USA
I want some clarification on what this means. I have interpreted it to mean "direct from the official source." provided that source is being disparaged. Perhaps a fellow employee is talking to you about new instructions from the boss: "I have some new instructions, straight from the horse's ass." Can you tell me if this is right, or maybe make it clearer, or tell me if I'm quite wrong?
 
  • pepperfire

    Senior Member
    Canada - English & French
    laughing out loud!... straight from the horse's mouth means direct from the source.
    Straight from the horse's *** means it is total untruth. :)
     
    Last edited:

    32000BTUGasGrill

    Member
    English - USA
    lol... straight from the horse's mouth means direct from the source.
    Straight from the horse's *** means it is total untruth. :)
    Ah, ok, I had thought 'horse's ass' was just a profane, more insulting way of saying 'horse's mouth' in this case, or maybe I was simply mixing up two different phrases. Thanks.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    An amusing paraphrasing of the expression "straight from the horse's mouth" meaning directly from a first-hand source.
    I don't agree with pepperfire's interpretation, however. Calling someone a horse's ass usually just means they're an idiot. By saying "straght from the horse's ass" he is calling his boss an idiot. I don't believe it relates to the truth of the information as this wouldn't really make much sense in relation to instructions.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I fully agree with liliput's good explanation, and the more delicate pile of euphemisms biblio has given in his paraphrase. It's a slam at the boss, and has nothing to do with the veracity of the statement.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    ... surely that would be straight from the bull's ass.

    Unpleasant, noxious, and even wise-ass people sometimes say things that are true. :p

    Consider:

    The scene— Mr. Ewester is fresh back from vacation, burned a nice lobster red, well-rested and in a foul mood because he's back at work. A colleague comes into his abattoir bearing news from the boss, an unlovable sort.

    Colleague: Hey Ewieeeeee! The horse's patootie says 'Welcome home, and we are giving you a well-earned raise!"
     

    Illuminatus

    Senior Member
    USA
    India, Hindi, English, Marathi
    Just the opposite:

    Slam : an aggressive remark directed at a person like a missile and intended to have a telling effect;
    An ode generally eulogizes.
     

    pepperfire

    Senior Member
    Canada - English & French
    An amusing paraphrasing of the expression "straight from the horse's mouth" meaning directly from a first-hand source.
    I don't agree with pepperfire's interpretation, however. Calling someone a horse's ass usually just means they're an idiot. By saying "straght from the horse's ass" he is calling his boss an idiot. I don't believe it relates to the truth of the information as this wouldn't really make much sense in relation to instructions.

    I have to concur and alter my original interpretation... This would make much more sense.
     
    Top