Strangely enough you have done it slowly nevertheless.

Dminor

Senior Member
Dutch, the Netherlands
I would like to translate the sentence in the title. This is my attempt:

"Curieusement tu l'as fait lentement néanmoins."
 
  • manford_witz

    New Member
    usa
    I would like to translate the sentence in the title. This is my attempt:

    "Curieusement tu l'as fait lentement néanmoins."
    This sentence in English may be grammatically correct, but it is a bad sentence, I think, because "strangely enough" carries the same meaning as "nevertheless."

    This sounds redundant to me.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    I would like to translate the sentence in the title. This is my attempt:

    "Curieusement tu l'as fait lentement néanmoins."
    In English, I'd say "Strangely enough, you've done it slowly, though." My attempt at French would be "Curieusement, tu l'as fait lentement quand même."

    This sentence in English may be grammatically correct, but it is a bad sentence, I think, because "strangely enough" carries the same meaning as "nevertheless."

    This sounds redundant to me.
    Not really. "Strangely/Interestingly/Funnily/Curiously enough" don't mean the same as "nevertheless," although you can omit one or the other without changing the meaning of the sentence. To me, it doesn't sound redundant; but if you insist, change "nevertheless" to "though" and it should be fine. :)
     

    Dminor

    Senior Member
    Dutch, the Netherlands
    This sentence in English may be grammatically correct, but it is a bad sentence, I think, because "strangely enough" carries the same meaning as "nevertheless."

    This sounds redundant to me.
    I disagree. Nevertheless only implies that the following sentence is true in spite of what has been said before. This sentence isn't necessarily a curiosity.

    In English, I'd say "Strangely enough, you've done it slowly, though." My attempt at French would be "Curieusement, tu l'as fait lentement quand même."
    Thanks!
     

    pozzo

    Senior Member
    inglés canadiense
    I don't disagree with quand même but just for throwing another in there, one could try: malgré tout which means in spite of everything.

    Curieusement, tu l'as fait lentement malgré tout.

    By the way, I think néanmoins is good but for some reason it sounds strange to me if it's at that place (i.e. at the end) of the sentence. Maybe it's because I've been staring at it for too long.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    By the way, I think néanmoins is good but for some reason it sounds strange to me if it's at that place (i.e. at the end) of the sentence. Maybe it's because I've been staring at it for too long.
    That's because it's normally not placed at the end of a sentence. However, if you place it at the beginning, the word "curieusement" bothers. It would sound strange to juxtapose both adverbials.

    By the way, I don't disagree with "malgré tout" either, but to me it implies a foregoing event or even several incidents that shaped the speaker's character in a greater way than it would with "quand même". But maybe this is splitting hairs. :)
     

    pozzo

    Senior Member
    inglés canadiense
    Whodunit, you put it very well. I had the same problem of wanting to put néanmoins at the beginning and then having it sound worse. I'm happy to hear you confirm that.

    But maybe this is splitting hairs. :)
    No it isn't, I think you're right.
     

    manford_witz

    New Member
    usa
    In English, I'd say "Strangely enough, you've done it slowly, though." My attempt at French would be "Curieusement, tu l'as fait lentement quand même."



    Not really. "Strangely/Interestingly/Funnily/Curiously enough" don't mean the same as "nevertheless," although you can omit one or the other without changing the meaning of the sentence. To me, it doesn't sound redundant; but if you insist, change "nevertheless" to "though" and it should be fine. :)
    I would never insist on changing nevertheless to though, since that does not mitigate the redundancy of curiously at the beginning.

    Why would anyone say "strangely enough" if they also said "though" or "nevertheless." It is a confusion of meaning because it is conflation of usage.
     

    manford_witz

    New Member
    usa
    Nevertheless only implies that the following sentence is true in spite of what has been said before. This sentence isn't necessarily a curiosity.
    "Curiously enough" and its equivalents do not mean that the statement or action referred to is a curiosity or is strange.

    They mean that there is a contradiction with something that went before.

    Example: "She said she hated Dresden.
    Option A: "Strangely enough, she goes there often."
    Option B: "She goes there often, nevertheless."

    You see, "strangely enough" and its equivalents mean the same thing as "nevertheless, though" and their equivalents.

    This point is not splitting hairs for an advanced ESL student or a good writer, although a lot of working- and middle-class native English speakers will make this mistake.
     

    pozzo

    Senior Member
    inglés canadiense
    In my opinion there could be a distinction between:

    I gave you a lot of help and explanations on how to do this.
    Not surprisingly, you have done it slowly nevertheless.

    I gave you a lot of help and explanations on how to do this.
    Strangely enough, you have done it slowly nevertheless.

    I may be taking us ever deeper into the hair-splitting region though.
     

    val_char

    New Member
    France (french)
    Through it is grammatically correct, "Curieusement tu l'as fait lentement néanmoins." does not sound french at all.
    If the meaning of the sentence is

    "I gave you a lot of help and explanations on how to do this.
    Strangely enough, you have done it slowly nevertheless.", as proposed by pozzo, then it can be translated as follows :

    "Curieusement, tu l'as quand même fait lentement"
     
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