strangle dramatically

keramus

Senior Member
Persian
Hello everyone

I want to describe a theatrical scene. An actor gets angry in the play and he strangles another actor dramatically.
I mean he is not trying to really strangle the other actor. He's just pretending to strangle the other actor. In other word, he just simulates strangling.
Does the highlighted part sound correct and natural in this context?

Please tell me your opinion.
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello keramus
    "Dramatically" does not have anything to do with the verb pretend, I'm afraid.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It might be simpler just to talk about what the characters do rather than the actors so you don't have to keep pointing out that the actors are only acting. ;) Even so, I don't think we're likely to jump to the conclusion that the actor became angry enough to kill the other actor in the middle of a scene.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Is it part of the play or not part of the play? If it's part of the play, just refer to the character. The actor is not getting mad, the character is.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    If it's in the play we would just say the first character strangles the second character. We know it's not real.

    Dr. Marfus becomes angry and strangles the maid.

    Dr. Marfus is played by an actor but the actor is not strangling anyone since no real person is being genuinely strangled.

    You can describe the actions of the character as if the character is a real person. You could say "Dr. Marfus strangles the maid violently". Or "Dr. Marfus strangles the maid quietly" depending on how the scene is acted out.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I want to describe a theatrical scene. An actor gets angry in the play and he strangles another actor dramatically.
    If you do something "dramatically", you do it in an emphasised manner, or in a manner that creates tension or strong emotions in the audience.
    I mean he is not trying to really strangle the other actor. He's just pretending to strangle the other actor.
    I don't know what plays are like in Persia, but in England, actors, on stage, rarely murder each other... :D They act in a manner so as to give the impression that they are strangling someone - that's what actors do... They act.
    Does the highlighted part sound correct and natural in this context?
    Yes, but I am not sure what you wanted to say. :oops:
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I don't know what plays are like in Persia, but in England, actors, on stage, rarely murder each other... :D They act in a manner so as to give the impression that they are strangling someone - that's what actors do... They act.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:
    Note the definition of strangle since it's commonly misused to mean "choke" whereas it really means "choke to death."
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It might be part of the play, and the audience is meant to get the impression that one actor has stepped out of character and attacked one of the other actors. But strangling him was just part of the act. Is this what you mean, Keramus?

    Recently a stand-up comedian died on stage and some of the audience laughed, thinking it was part of the act.
     
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