streaky bacon

HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
The dictionary says it's British English. Don't people in North America use it? It's easily imaginable --- bacon with streaks of fat.
streaky bacon [uncountable] British English

smoked or salted meat from a pig that has lines of fat going through it
(Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English)
 
  • HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    So does that mean there is unsteaky bacon in the U.K., I ask those in the U.K. I too only see fat-streaky bacon over here. To make it a language query, does the term 'unsteaky bacon' work in the U.K.?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    In the UK, we have 'non-streaky' bacon called 'back bacon', with fat along only one edge of the slices, not running through it. It might be called Canadian bacon in the USA.

    Added: Here's an article and pictures of the three sorts with back bacon at the front right and streaky above it. I wasn't quite right about the Canadian bacon

    http://www.endlesssimmer.com/2010/11/09/three-little-pigs/

    Hermione
     
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    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Back bacon seemed to be the default in Scotland, so again it was called simply "bacon."

    Wish I could get some here....
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Actually the choice of bacon in the UK is even broader than has been mentioned so far.

    The three main cuts are streaky (from the belly), back (not surprisingly from the back!) and middle-cut (a larger rasher cut across belly and back; less common in supermarkets these days, but still available from butchers). We always had middle-cut when I was a kid: it was cheaper than back, but not as fatty as streaky.

    There's also gammon, which some would argue (for both culinary and etymological reasons) is not bacon, but ham. However, a grilled gammon rasher is closer in appearance to thick-cut back bacon than to what we usually call "ham" in the UK. I know one family who refer to gammon rashers as "posh bacon".

    And it's not only the cuts that provide variety. Bacon can be dry-cured, wet-cured or smoked. It can be cut to any thickness you prefer (I can't remember exactly how many settings there are on a butcher's slicer, but it must be at least 10). When I first moved to France, the local butcher had a machine with all those settings, but only ever used two: very thin for roasting garnish, and very thick for 'lardons'. When I asked for something like a number 3 thickness, he laughingly said he didn't know if the machine even worked at that setting! (The French really weren't into grilled or fried bacon.;))

    Ws:)
     

    Smauler

    Senior Member
    British English
    Back bacon in the UK in the supermarkets is sold both "smoked" and unsmoked - they have about as large a section for bacon as they do for milk, sometimes.

    It's all variants on a theme, though. If I buy from supermarkets, it's just thick cut unsmoked.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Just confirming that the back bacon v. streaky bacon (and smoked v. unsmoked) distinction is true of the bacon sold here and in Australia. I've occasionally seen 'middle cut' bacon (as mentioned by Wordsmyth), but that is not standardly available in supermarkets.

    Are you saying that in Japan, 'bacon' just means streaky bacon as in the US?
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Just confirming that the back bacon v. streaky bacon (and smoked v. unsmoked) distinction is true of the bacon sold here and in Australia. I've occasionally seen 'middle cut' bacon (as mentioned by Wordsmyth), but that is not standardly available in supermarkets.

    Are you saying that in Japan, 'bacon' just means streaky bacon as in the US?
    Um, personally I'd say yes, Nat. But the bacon here is so, what should I say, soft. And that's what makes it different.
     
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    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Can you describe what you mean by saying the bacon is soft?

    I only know the USA bacon that is streaky. It is soft before you cook it, and crispy afterward. Is bacon in Japan still soft after cooking?
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    By soft I meant close to tender or even rare. If you really cook it, it turns crispy. By comparison, it's rare (although it's heat treated, and some say you could eat it as it is without cooking it).
     
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    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Can you describe what you mean by saying the bacon is soft?

    I only know the USA bacon that is streaky. It is soft before you cook it, and crispy afterward. Is bacon in Japan still soft after cooking?
    Personally, I don't like my bacon to be really crisp - I prefer it to be somewhat limp, which could be called "soft."
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    By soft I meant close to tender or even rare. If you really cook it, it turns crispy. By comparison, it's rare (although it's heat treated, and some say you could eat it as it is without cooking it).
    Ooops, I was half awake half asleep. I changed the word order to make it make sense. I wrote that five minutes after I woke up.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Personally, I don't like my bacon to be really crisp - I prefer it to be somewhat limp, which could be called "soft."
    Then you'd be a fan of English bacon, RM. Whatever the cut, it's generally thicker than US bacon, so it stays pliable even if it's well cooked. It's almost impossible to cook it to that brittle state where it shatters when you try to cut it!

    Ws:)
     
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