Street trash

xebonyx

Senior Member
TR/AR/EN
This is a derogatory term exclusively used in English when we're talking about homeless people, or debasing someone's physical attributes, standards, to say they are low class. In Spanish, there's "chusma", for example.

Is there a similar term like this in Arabic? Does حرام suffice?
 
  • cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    I'm not sure about an equivalent, but sometimes we use "mutasharrid" for someone who's -voluntarily or not- homeless or of very bad manners...

    حرام doesn't have any relation with this. 7araam means religiously illicit.
     

    djamal 2008

    Senior Member
    arabic
    i'm not sure about an equivalent, but sometimes we use "mutasharrid" for someone who's -voluntarily or not- homeless or of very bad manners...

    حرام doesn't have any relation with this. 7araam means religiously illicit.
    إبن شارع
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    حرام doesn't have any relation with this. 7araam means religiously illicit.


    Yes, but ابن حرام = bastard (literally); then it began to used in the same way the English bastard is currently used. It's not equivalent to street trash though.

    ---------------

    I agree with ابن الشارع, or ابن شوارع; but this term doesn't imply that someone is homeless, just that he "as good as homeless" since he was raised "in the street". It implies that the person's parent did not bother to teach him values, manners and ethics.

    متشرد seems like the best option, but although it's derogatory it's not as derogatory as street trash.
     

    xebonyx

    Senior Member
    TR/AR/EN
    Thanks for your responses. I guess was influenced by how in English we tend to throw "7araam" around loosely to mean someone who's engaged in detestable acts/has low morals.
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    In the Egyptian dialect I believe one could say صايع Saayi3 or the extended phrase صايع وضايع Saayi3 wa-Daayi3. I've always had trouble expressing Saayi3 in English, but it is somewhat like 'worthless' or 'good-for-nothing', and applies to someone who is often unemployed and just hangs around with no purpose. So someone who is Saayi3 wa-Daayi3 is a complete miscreant.

    That word (and the phrase as well), in and of itself, does not connote the idea of being homeless (as far as I'm aware), but rather, as I explained above a worthless person, but I believe one could say صايع في الشارع/الشوارع to indicate that someone just spends their time loitering around in the streets with no purpose.

    Perhaps a native Egyptian can shed more light on it.

    As a side note, I just wanted to say that being homeless is not necessarily indicative of having bad manners. Sure, some homeless persons may have bad manners, but not all. Of course, this occurs in English as well where a word that refers to a homeless person can also mean a person with no manners or a good-for-nothing. One such word is the word 'bum'.
     
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    xebonyx

    Senior Member
    TR/AR/EN
    As a side note,I just wanted to say that being homeless is not necessarily indicative of having bad manners. Sure, some homeless persons may have bad manners, but not all. Of course, this occurs in English as well where a word that refers to a homeless person can also mean a person with no manners or a good-for-nothing. One such word is the word 'bum'.
    Yeah, that's why I clarified it by saying it's a derogatory reference ocassionally used in that context, with one of the common connotations being to compare someone to a homeless person (hence the word "street"---ie. living on the streets, or one deserves no better conditions than the streets), or having low quality in general. They're not synonymous, but they are often lumped together. Anyway, I've definitely been down that road many times before.
     
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