stress is a 'disease/illness' [?]

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  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Welcome to the WordReference forums, Jeangrey.

    Normally, I would think of stress as causing illnesses or diseases. Do you mean this in a more figurative sense rather than a strictly medical sense?

    (Also: Please remember to use correct sentence capitalization and punctuation.)
     

    jeangrey

    New Member
    English(Wales)/Italian - bilingua
    I'm actually reading this paper from a work-related stress congress and it says "Stress is an illness that may reduce effectiveness at work"
    Since I wouldn't say it is an illness nor a disease I was just wondering...

    Thanks
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    disease:


    in Spanish | in French | in Italian
    in context | images Listen:
    US - UK

    Concise Oxford English Dictionary © 2008 Oxford University Press:
    disease

    ▶noun
    • 1 a disorder of structure or function in a human, animal, or plant, especially one that produces specific symptoms or that affects a specific part.
    • 2 a quality or disposition that adversely affects a person or group: the British disease of self-deprecation.
    – derivatives
    diseased adjective.
    – origin ME (in the sense ‘lack of ease; inconvenience’): from OFr. desaise ‘lack of ease’
     

    jeangrey

    New Member
    English(Wales)/Italian - bilingua
    So pops91710, you mean that despite what bibliolept and I think...defining stress as a 'disease' would have been better than 'illness anyway?!?!

    Thanks
     

    pops91710

    Senior Member
    English, AE
    So pops91710, you mean that despite what bibliolept and I think...defining stress as a 'disease' would have been better than 'illness anyway?!?!

    Thanks
    No, I think either way is acceptable. I only wonder if they avoided the term disease for some other reason. I just added the definition to show it seems to be synonymous with illness. Usually, as I see it more frequently used, mental disorders are described using the term illness. Undoubtedly someone will come up with an exception.
     

    Wertis

    Banned
    Russian
    Stress is not a disease, as far as I know. Stress is the result of our organism reacting to some unusual, frightening, or embarassing situation. Stress is temporary, not permanent. It passes with time. For example examination can result in stress, but when you've finished an exam you fell better and less nervous. Also people might experience stress when flying on a plane or driving in dangerous areas (in mountains). When you talk about a condition which is followed by some characteristic sympthoms connected with stress, it's depression. Depression is a disease and should be treated. I don't think doctors nowadays single out stress as a disease.

    I'm not a doctor and my reasoning is based on general knowledge and information I've heard from different sources available to everyone (TV, newspapers, the Internet).
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I would say that stress could certainly be called a condition, but it is very likely that the term 'illness' has been deliberately chosen and very arguable indeed that chronic stress is an illness which often results in various forms of disease, whether physical, psychological or psychiatric. Depression is not the one inevitable result of chronic stress. With chronic stress, the essential, normal and healthy 'flight or fight' physiological responses to stressful episodes never abate.

    I wouldn't be at all bothered by seeing stress described as a 'disease'.

    Hermione
     

    Yichen

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    A similar question,

    James was weak from a long _____. I think he should have good rest and enough nutrition.
    A. disease
    B. sickness
    C. illness
    D. unhappiness
    Key C
    Link: James was weak...

    I would choose C, too.
    I think the latter half of the topic question suggests James needs to recover from a "state".

    Is the question itself all right?
    Many thanks.
     
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