stressed Stanley products!

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Stephanagreg

Senior Member
FRANCE FRENCH
Hello,

Well, this isn't really about meaning, but I was wondering if:

you would rather stress the first syllable of Stanley or that of products when referring to this well-known range of American homeware (I often buy STANley products, as in I often buy VAcuum cleaners; or I like Stanley PROducts, as in I like stone BUILdings)?

Many thanks for whatever help you could provide me with.

Warm regards,

Stephan
 
  • Stephanagreg

    Senior Member
    FRANCE FRENCH
    Well, I guess I'll have to spill the beans. I am currently working on a linguistic analysis of compound forms, and one of the instances of such forms I am considering is the compound noun: 'Stanley products woman', which appears in a short story by Raymond Carver. In this story, a man meets his father at the airport. The two men then strike a conversation in which the father explains to his son how, a few years earlier, a woman he barely knew became his lover. He then tells his son how, one day, he opened the door to the women in question when she rang the bell. The first thing he says by way of description is precisely that she was 'a Stanley products woman'.

    If you had to read the story aloud, could I ask how, instinctively, you think you would stress the compound?
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    STANley PROducts woman - my emphasis would be roughly the same on both of the first two words, dropping off for wo'man.
     
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