Strife vs. argument

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jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
The "strife" or "argument" between a couple not only hurts their feelings but also their children's.


Is the difference between "strife" and "argument" that "strife" includes the physical violence? Thank you.
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    "Strife" does not necessarily involve physical violence, jokaec. What are you trying to say in your sentence? Are you talking about a single argument, or a long-standing pattern of fighting? In what situation would you say this?
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    "Strife" does not necessarily involve physical violence, jokaec. What are you trying to say in your sentence? Are you talking about a single argument, or a long-standing pattern of fighting? In what situation would you say this?
    Thank you, Florentia52.
    I am talking about a long-standing pattern of argument and fighting. Can I use “strife” for a couple who argues or even fights with each other?
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    You can, but it's a formal and rather old-fashioned word, rarely used in conversation.
    Also, "argument" typically refers to a single occasion. It also has several meanings, for example, formal argumentation as a kind of discourse such as in a debate, in the courtroom, or between academicians.

    You could say;

    constant bickering
    constant arguing
    persistent bickering
    persistent arguing.

    There are probably many alternatives.
     
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