Strife

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superneverland

New Member
Portuguese
Hello!

I have a doubt about how to use the word "strife".

How shall I say/write:

- Why the hell you still want the strife?
or
- Why the hell you still want to strife?

Many thanks in advance...
 
  • manon33

    Senior Member
    English - England (Yorkshire)
    Do not say 'to strife' - it isn't a verb.

    Is it a playscript you are writing?
     

    Renaissance man

    Senior Member
    What do you want to express?
    Your first sentence seems correct, except that in proper English it's "Why the hell do you want the strife?", but it strikes me as an unusual and unidiomatic thing to say.

    "to strife" is incorrect; the corresponding verb is spelled "to strive". However, the noun strife and the verb to strive have grown apart, so they should probably not be used in the same context.
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hello!

    I have a doubt about how to use the word "strife".

    How shall I say/write:

    - Why the hell do you still want the strife? :tick:
    or
    - Why the hell you still want to strife? :cross:

    Many thanks in advance...
    We don't use the word strife much these days. Your first sentence is OK, but someone would be more likely to say 'hassle' as a synonym for strife. A phrase you might read or hear is 'trouble and strife' - this is almost comical in effect. It is actually Cockney rhyming slang which stands for 'wife' ["I've just had an argument with the trouble and strife."] Please don't use this - I just throw it in as background information!
    In your second sentence you use strife as a verb, and this is incorrect, as it is an abstract noun. There is a verb 'to strive' (meaning to try hard, to endeavour).
     

    mr cat

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It's a word that is used quite frequently, at least in my generation, here in NE UK, phrases like;
    I could do without all this strife,
    It's too much strife,
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    It's a word that is used quite frequently, at least in my generation, here in NE UK, phrases like;
    I could do without all this strife,
    It's too much strife,
    Yes, Mr Cat, you are right - it is quite often used, now I come to think of it. But perhaps, as you say, by an older generation.
     

    manon33

    Senior Member
    English - England (Yorkshire)
    It's a word that is used quite frequently, at least in my generation, here in NE UK, phrases like;
    I could do without all this strife,
    It's too much strife,
    I agree. My sense is that 'strife' is used at least as much as 'hassle' in the north of England. 'Stress' is also a synonym.
     

    superneverland

    New Member
    Portuguese
    What do you want to express?
    Your first sentence seems correct, except that in proper English it's "Why the hell do you want the strife?", but it strikes me as an unusual and unidiomatic thing to say.

    "to strife" is incorrect; the corresponding verb is spelled "to strive". However, the noun strife and the verb to strive have grown apart, so they should probably not be used in the same context.
    We don't use the word strife much these days. Your first sentence is OK, but someone would be more likely to say 'hassle' as a synonym for strife. A phrase you might read or hear is 'trouble and strife' - this is almost comical in effect. It is actually Cockney rhyming slang which stands for 'wife' ["I've just had an argument with the trouble and strife."] Please don't use this - I just throw it in as background information!
    In your second sentence you use strife as a verb, and this is incorrect, as it is an abstract noun. There is a verb 'to strive' (meaning to try hard, to endeavour).
    Thank you very much. Your answers have been very helpfull.
    Well, I believe that it's quite unusual... but, I need something that rhymes with "wife" in the context of a song: "You say that life is passing you by / Then why the hell you still want the strife / Are you sure you need a private eye / You'll become Lot's wife". Something like that...
     
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