strolled into the sauna (in the?) Finnish-style

ironman2012

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

The writer took a friend from New York to a public sauna in Finland:
When we were in the changing room, I smiled and remarked to my friend, “This is where we leave the towels, man.” He was not amused. Clutching his towel around his waist, he growled, “No way.”
Unfazed, I hung up my own towel and strolled into the sauna Finnish-style.

(This comes from theatlantic.com The Bad American Habits I Kicked in Finland by TIMOTHY D. WALKER Feb 4, 2015.)

Is the blue part correct? I think "in" should be added before "Finnish-style", that is, strolled into the sauna in the Finnish-style.

Thanks in advance!
 
  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I think "Finnish-style" describes the manner in which he strolled into the sauna: he simply went in naked.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree. "Finnish-style" is a direct replacement for "naked", and "in the" is not needed. I would go further and say that to add them would be wrong. You could have "in the Finnish style", without the hyphen.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    It's not a familiar phrase but it's directly implied three times in the extract: “This is where we leave the towels, man.” He was not amused. Clutching his towel around his waist, he growled, “No way.” Unfazed, I hung up my own towel..."
     

    Määränpää

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    The grammatical explanation seems to be that "[x]-style" or "[x] style" functions as an adverb:

    Definition of STYLE
    -style
    adjective combining form or adverb combining form
    As an adverb, "Finnish-style" is less formal than "in the Finnish style". I think the informal word choice is meant to convey an idea of relaxedness and self-confidence in a humorous way.
     

    ironman2012

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It's not a familiar phrase but it's directly implied three times in the extract: “This is where we leave the towels, man.” He was not amused. Clutching his towel around his waist, he growled, “No way.” Unfazed, I hung up my own towel..."
    Can I understand this way:
    1. "strolled into the sauna Finnish-style/in the Finnish style" both can refer to "naked" in this context.
    2. "in the ... style" are often shortened to "-style" in informal speech.
     
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