strutture metalliche per inchiavardare i muri portanti

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by theartichoke, Oct 9, 2018.

  1. theartichoke Senior Member

    English -- Canada
    Hello all,

    After searching through various dictionaries, I've found that "chiavarde" would seem to be "bolts," so "inchiavardare" is "to bolt," but I'm still not getting a clear mental picture of what this line is describing, let alone how to translate it. The full sentence is simply referring to how certain funds were spent after an earthquake in the late 19th century: "...i fondi stanziati per il terremoto, che si concretizzarono in parte nella fornitura di strutture metalliche per inchiavardare i muri portanti degli edifici, e in parte nella costruzione di baracche di legno...".

    It seems odd to refer to bolts as "strutture metalliche," so I'm not sure these "strutture" are what are doing the bolting itself; and I'm having trouble imagining how one uses a bolt to shore up a load-bearing wall. (This kind of thing is way out of my field of expertise--I'm hoping it's perfectly obvious to someone else!) At the moment, I've got it translated with the oh-so-vague were spent partly on metal reinforcements to support the load-bearing walls of buildings, but if anyone can help me be at least as precise as the original, that would be great.:)
     
  2. Mary49

    Mary49 Senior Member

    Padova
    Italian
  3. Benzene

    Benzene Senior Member

    GENOA (ITALY)
    Italian from Italy
  4. Mary49

    Mary49 Senior Member

    Padova
    Italian
    Per me "to bolt" non funziona...
     
  5. theartichoke Senior Member

    English -- Canada
    I don't think "bolt" works in this context either, but now that I know such a thing is called an "anchor plate" and is used in conjunction with a "tie rod" (thanks, Mary!), I can use "reinforce" as a verb: spent partly on anchor plates and tie rods to reinforce the load-bearing walls of buildings. Lacking a sufficiently specific translation for "inchiavardare," I can at least transfer the specificity to the "strutture metalliche" and use a less specific verb.
     
  6. Benzene

    Benzene Senior Member

    GENOA (ITALY)
    Italian from Italy
    Please look at this old thread, here: inchiavardato

    Bye,
    Benzene
     
  7. theartichoke Senior Member

    English -- Canada
    I did, and while I realize that una chiavarda is a heavy-duty bolt, and so inchiavardare is "to bolt," I can't figure out how to make "to bolt" work in English in this precise sentence. In English, I think you have to bolt something to something: you can't just "bolt" a wall, can you? (Honest question--as I said, this is out of my wheelhouse.:confused:) A literal translation of ....spent partly on metal devices to bolt the load-bearing walls doesn't clearly convey what's going on. I could talk about metal bolts to reinforce the load-bearing walls--this might actually make for a clearer picture than the technical terms "anchor plates and tie rods"--but I don't see how to use "bolt" as a verb here.
     
  8. elfa

    elfa Senior Member

    Bath, England
    English
    I agree about not using "bolt" here. I'm no structural expert, but to me "reinforce" seems logical. After all, you use wall ties and anchor plates for the express purpose of reinforcing walls after there has been movement, subsidence etc.
     
  9. MR1492

    MR1492 Senior Member

    Newport News, Virginia
    English -USA
    I think the term you are looking for is "anchor bolts." As noted above by elfa, we use metal rods and anchor bolts to reinforce damaged walls and hold the structures together. They can also be like those mentioned by Mary in post #2 where they are actually embedded into masonry or concrete walls to reinforce and stabilize them. However, those are normally installed during the initial construction. So, while it might be wordy, you could use, "...metal structural supports and anchors to stabilize the buildings."

    Phil
     

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