student of? student at?

Paty.Sol

Member
Spanish
Hi everyone :)

I have a really big doubt...
What is the correct one?

Profile: International Business student at San Ignacio de Loyola University. An easily adaptable, conscientious, enthusiastic, and self-motivated individual.

Profile: International Business student of San Ignacio de Loyola University. An easily adaptable, conscientious, enthusiastic, and self-motivated individual.

student of or student at?
"Individual" is the accurate word to use here or not?
 
  • Top Gun

    New Member
    English
    Hello

    student at San Ignacio is correct
    "at" refers to a place in this sentence.

    "of" would be incorrect because you would use it describing a field of education.

    Ex: I am a student of law.

    But the more common way to say that would be, I am a law student.
     

    Poquoson711

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    But in this particular instance, it's the institution.

    Yes, I understand that. I just wanted to show the using "student of" can be correct in a different context. In summary...

    • Student at a given university.
    • Student of a given professor.
    • Student of a given course of study.
    Did I miss any other uses?
     
    Yes, I understand that. I just wanted to show the using "student of" can be correct in a different context. In summary...

    • Student at a given university.
    • Student of a given professor.
    • Student of a given course of study.
    Did I miss any other uses?

    No, but note that to say "I am a student of Dr. Johnson" would indicate that Dr. Johnson was not your teacher, but was instead the subject that you studied (for example, you were studying the literary works of the 18th Century English writer, Dr. Samuel Johnson.) If Dr. Johnson is your teacher, rather than the subject of your studies, you need to use the possessive form and say "I am a student of Dr. Johnson's", or "I am one of Dr. Johnson's students."
     

    Poquoson711

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    If Dr. Johnson is your teacher, rather than the subject of your studies, you need to use the possessive form and say "I am a student of Dr. Johnson's", or "I am one of Dr. Johnson's students."
    After thinking about it, I believe you are right. I just hadn't listened for the possessive 's before; it is such a short sound and easily overlooked.
     

    Utiavrev

    New Member
    Portuguese
    Which preposition is accurate with the expression “doctoral” before “student”?

    1- I am a doctoral student of Public Policies.
    2- I am a doctoral student in Public Policies.

    Plus, should I always use PhD. instead of “doctoral”?

    Also, if I want to use a verb with “doctoral degree” , which one can I say:

    1- I am taking a doctoral degree.
    2- I am getting a doctoral degree.
    3- I am doing a doctoral degree.
     

    Damoetas

    New Member
    English - American
    Which preposition is accurate with the expression “doctoral” before “student”?

    1- I am a doctoral student of Public Policies.
    2- I am a doctoral student in Public Policies.

    Plus, should I always use PhD. instead of “doctoral”?
    In the US, we tend to say "Public Policy" (singular) instead of plural "Policies." (Don't know about other places.)

    Anyway, you should use "in": "I am a doctoral student in Public Policy."

    You can also say "I am a PhD student ..." I think both ways are equally common.

    Also good:
    "I am doing a PhD in Public Policy."
    "I am working on a PhD in Public Policy."
    "I am studying for a PhD in Public Policy."

    It's good to have variety!
     

    Utiavrev

    New Member
    Portuguese
    In the US, we tend to say "Public Policy" (singular) instead of plural "Policies." (Don't know about other places.)

    Anyway, you should use "in": "I am a doctoral student in Public Policy."

    You can also say "I am a PhD student ..." I think both ways are equally common.

    Also good:
    "I am doing a PhD in Public Policy."
    "I am working on a PhD in Public Policy."
    "I am studying for a PhD in Public Policy."

    It's good to have variety!
    Thank you for your answer!

    One extra question:

    If I am chatting with doctoral students from different universities, which one works best:
    1- I am a doctoral student from a university in New York.
    2- I am a doctoral student at a university in New York.

    Or are both equally correct (depending on the context)?
     

    Damoetas

    New Member
    English - American
    Thank you for your answer!

    One extra question:

    If I am chatting with doctoral students from different universities, which one works best:
    1- I am a doctoral student from a university in New York.
    2- I am a doctoral student at a university in New York.

    Or are both equally correct (depending on the context)?
    I think both are correct depending on context. For the first one, maybe you're at an academic conference in another state, and you want to say that you came from such-and-such a university to attend the conference. The second one is a more general statement that you could use anywhere.

    PS I have a PhD myself, so I have participated in these kinds of conversations! For example, "I have a PhD from University of X." "I did my PhD at University of X." "I went to University of X for my PhD." All are good in the right context.
     
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