studente fuoricorso

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viria

Senior Member
Italy - Italian
Hullo everybody!
I apologize for my question, but really I have no idea... Does the expression "out-of-course student" exist, referred to university students?
Thanks!
 
  • Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Credo che non esista proprio il concetto di "fuori corso" come lo intendiamo noi.
    La parola va tradotta con una piccola frase tipo " university student who has not passed all his exams within the prescribed period of time."
     

    viria

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Grazie. Era il mio stesso dubbio, ma un mio collega ha tradotto dall'italiano in inglese out of course, gettando dentro di me il seme del dubbio!!!
    Ricorreggerò il tutto con perifrasi, come anche io penso sia più adatto.
     

    Samaa

    New Member
    Italian
    Hi everybody,

    can anyone help me with this translation?

    IN QUALITA DI STUDENTE FUORI CORSO

    I find it difficult as in the UK there's no 'fuori corso'. I found ' out-of-course student', but it just doesn't sound right to me... Any suggestions??

    Thank you,

    Samaa
     

    luna1

    Senior Member
    italian
    Hi, I'm translating a certificate issued by an italian university, and i'm not sure about the correct translation of the words "fuori corso", as in Uk we haven't got it. I've seen it is possible to translate it with a perifrase, could you help me?

    "è iscritto fuori corso del 5° anno"
    "He is registered over the 5thy year as has no passed all the exams"

    thank you
     

    Helen77

    Member
    Italian
    La mia università, nei regolamenti in inglese per le borse di studio, scrive "supplementay year student" e "supplementary year of studies" per indicare il "fuori corso".
    Può essere una traduzione valida secondo Voi?

    grazie!
     

    alicip

    Senior Member
    Italiano ITA-Romeno ROU-Inglese AmE
    Io ho trovato su questo sito: "out-of-course students". Non so perché, ma non mi convince anche se in realtà è un sito canadese. Non riesco a capire se si riferisce appunto a "studenti fuoricorso" oppure ad altro.
    Anch'io devo tradurre (si tratta di un certificato di carriera scolastica/universitaria) la seguente frase e non ho la minima idea di come farlo:
    "2012/2013 iscrizione fuori corso al 1 anno del corso di laurea in XXX".
    Il vostro aiuto sarebbe come sempre molto gradito. Grazie mille a tutti. :)
     

    TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Ciao,

    Al sito universitario Milano-Bicocca ho trovato questa definizione:

    Sono considerati fuori corso:
    • gli studenti che, al termine degli anni di iscrizione normale, non hanno acquisito tutti i crediti richiesti per conseguire il titolo
    • studenti che, al termine di un anno di corso, non hanno superato gli esami obbligatori per il passaggio all'anno successivo, nei casi previsti dai Regolamenti dei Corsi di Studio.

    E mi pare che si usi la descrizione in un contesto, un 'corso' molto rigido.

    Qua in America è comune fare un'iscrizione a punto A, lascia l'universita per lavorare un anno, o viaggiare, tornare all'universita per completare il 'corso' - come la nostra lingua, siamo molto flessibile:)

    In AE puoi trovare "non-traditional" "non-traditional path" "part-time" "advanced placement" "delayed graduation" "outside the normal/regular/conventional/typical path" o più comune - non dare una descrizione.

    Comunque (sempre scrivo toppo) per aiutarti:
    2012/2013 iscrizione fuori corso al 1 anno del corso di laurea in XXX
    Enrolled for a bachelor degree in XXX in 2012/2013
    Enrolled in a non-traditional path for a bachelor...

    In the mouth of the wolf!
     

    alicip

    Senior Member
    Italiano ITA-Romeno ROU-Inglese AmE
    Thanks Tim. In the end I opted for "out-of-course". I am aware that this is not the best option, but I have seen it translated like this in some Italian universities and in some degree theses. On top of that, I have seen that some translators on Proz have opted for this translation as well.
    I have managed to find another text (Loyola University, COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 1967-1968) where this phrase is being used (even if the year is as you can see 1967-1968 :eek:) in which this expression appears:
    "Out-of-Course Students— A limited number of students who, though qualified for admission do not wish to be degree candidates, may be permitted by written permission of the Dean to register as Out-of-Course, not to exceed fom' semesters. Such students may later become degree candidates if their status is changed to that of a regular student with a minimum schedule load of twelve semester hours."
     

    joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Hi alicip - the description you quoted (from 1967) refers to what we normally call "non-matriculated" students - students who take courses but are not enrolled in a degree program. Usually there is a limit to the number of courses that can be taken this way. Not sure what your quote is meant to say - "Not to exceed ???? semesters."
    Anyway, I've been around universities most of my life and here in the US I've never heard "out-of-course student" used at all.
     

    alicip

    Senior Member
    Italiano ITA-Romeno ROU-Inglese AmE
    Hi Joan. Thank you very much. :)
    OK, "out-of-course" is not used. Then how would you translate "fuori corso" in my context? I mean, I cannot add a footnote nor can I write "university student who has not passed all his exams within the prescribed period of time" as this is an official/original "transcript of academic record". These are the sentences I need to translate:
    La sig.ra A B ha chiesto di effettuare un trasferimento in data DD/MM/2011.
    Ammessa ed iscritta al 1 anno IN CORSO del Corso di laurea in XXX presso l'università YYY.
    - (academic year) 2012/2013 iscrizione in corso al 2 anno del Corso di laurea in XXX presso l'università YYY.
    - (academic year) 2013/2014 iscrizione in corso al 3 anno del Corso di laurea in XXX presso l'università YYY.
    - (academic year) 2014/2015 iscrizione fuori corso al 1 anno del Corso di laurea in XXX presso l'università YYY.
    Please note that in the academic year 2011/2012 she was enrolled in another degree program/course at another university (say ZZZ). She asked to be transferred from ZZZ to YYY - the transfer was accepted. XXX is the same degree program/course. :eek:
    Your help would be highly appreciated. :)

    And could you please tell me whether the following quote (1940s) refers to "non-matriculated" students too?
    http://barrettfamilymemoir.com/Barrett/41x41xe.htm
    "I was president of the Boston Latin School Association from 1941 to 1944.This year I have been asked to serve as judge at the school's annual prize declamation,for I am a member of the class which is fifty years out this year. I had graduated from grammar school before entering so I did not take the regular six year course. Boys so entering were known as 'out of course' students and were expected to get back into course at the end of their first or second year. I have never forgotten my first home lesson at Boston Latin School, memorizing declination of 'mensa'. I walked around and around a table at home and very seriously considered transferring to some other school."

    After hours and hours of online searches I have finally found this:

    Students who have failed a unit/s (of up to 20 credit points in undergraduate modular programmes) and cannot progress to the next academic year. This normally would result from failing their end of year exams and the subsequent re-sit. = Register on supplementary year for the failed units and for additional study skills units as determined by the Faculty.
    http://www.bristol.ac.uk/academic-quality/assessment/annex/supplementaryyear.html

    Might "enrolled/registered on supplementary year" be the solution to my pains? :confused:
     
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    joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Hi - sorry I really don't think I can offer you a good translation of "in corso/fuori corso" as I am still struggling to understand this concept in Italian. :(
    The second quote (about Boston Latin) made me smile because it exactly describes my high school experience. Here I think the term "out of course" refers specifically to this high school and to other similar ones - not a generally understood term. We never used it in my school (1960s) but it worked like this (and I think the quote matches this) - High schools here are generally four years, but some special schools take students in 7th grade, for a 6-year program. This writer (like me) entered after 8th grade and thus had only 4 years to try to match or "get back into course" with the other students. So, for example, they took Algebra in 8th grade, and thus had four years in high school to take advanced math courses.

    Maybe "supplementary year" is a good option. No more pain!
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Nell’ordinamento universitario, iscrizione fuori corso. (al primo, secondo, ... anno fuori c.), quella che viene concessa agli studenti (perciò detti studenti fuori corso) che non abbiano sostenuto tutti gli esami stabiliti o non abbiano conseguito la laurea nel prescritto numero di anni.
     

    alicip

    Senior Member
    Italiano ITA-Romeno ROU-Inglese AmE
    Thank you very much once again Joan! :)
    I was born in the USA in 1979 and grew up there. I came here in Italy in 1999 so I know nothing about "out-of-course" being used as in my previous quotes. Not even my mom (born 1957) remembers this usage of "out-of-course". :(
    Nevetheless, I fully understood the meaning after having read your wonderful explanation.

    I'll go with "supplementary year" and no more pain!
    @Paulfromitaly: Grazie Paul. :) Io so benissimo cosa significa essere iscritto fuori corso ma purtroppo come ho già detto non posso mettere una dicitura del genere ("university student who has not passed all his exams within the prescribed period of time") su questo "certificato di carriera scolastica/universitaria". :(

    Esempio dal mio testo:
    - (anno accademico) 2012/2013 iscrizione in corso al 2 anno del Corso di laurea in XXX presso l'università YYY.
    - (anno accademico) 2013/2014 iscrizione in corso al 3 anno del Corso di laurea in XXX presso l'università YYY.
    - (anno accademico) 2014/2015 iscrizione fuori corso al 1 anno del Corso di laurea in XXX presso l'università YYY.
    Che io ho tradotto così:
    - (academic year) 2012/2013 enrolled/registered in the 2nd year of the degree course/program in XXX at YYY. (qui nemmeno traduco "in corso" visto che altri traduttori che traducono questi certificati da una vita mi hanno detto che sarebbe superfluo tradurlo in inglese)
    - (academic year) 2013/2014 enrolled/registered in the 3rd year of the degree course/program in XXX at YYY. (idem; non traduco "in corso")
    - (academic year) 2014/2015 enrolled/registered in the 1st supplementary year of the degree course/program in XXX at YYY.

    Secondo voi faccio bene a non tradurre "in corso"? E cosa ne pensate riguardo a "supplementary year" come traduzione per "fuori corso" in questo contesto? Grazie mille a tutti! :)
     

    joanvillafane

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Thanks, Paul. I get how it's used in Italy (mostly) but when I say "I'm struggling" it's because of the complex cultural issues involved. As TimLA alluded to, this is not a phrase (in any description) that we would ever expect to see on a resume or CV. There is nothing negative here about taking more than 4 years to get a degree. In general, for a student who has not yet graduated (and is at any point in his studies), we might see something like "Date of expected graduation - 2018." - Nothing at all about how long it took or is taking or will take.
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Thanks, Paul. I get how it's used in Italy (mostly) but when I say "I'm struggling" it's because of the complex cultural issues involved. As TimLA alluded to, this is not a phrase (in any description) that we would ever expect to see on a resume or CV. There is nothing negative here about taking more than 4 years to get a degree. In general, for a student who has not yet graduated (and is at any point in his studies), we might see something like "Date of expected graduation - 2018." - Nothing at all about how long it took or is taking or will take.
    I see what you mean.
    I don't think one would need to write this kind of info in a CV (as you say, once you have a degree it doesn't really matter whether it took you 4 or 5 years to graduate), but you usually find it in a student's record.
     

    TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I'm with Paul, all that matters is if you graduate with a degree.
    But I'm torn between an accurate translation (if it is a legal document) and a "meaningful" translation.

    If I were put in this position:
    lampoondog.jpg

    I'd go with something like "Enrolled in an out-of-phase course in WR translations".

    and if anyone asked, I'd give an explanation.


    Edit: another thought: 'Off-schedule'
     
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    alicip

    Senior Member
    Italiano ITA-Romeno ROU-Inglese AmE
    Lo so che tu lo sai, ma Joan sembra non aver ancora chiaro il concetto :)
    Hai ragione! :) Mi scuso con te e con Joan perché ero proprio disperato - sono due giorni che cerco di trovare una traduzione accettabile. Anch'io insegno all'università (e purtroppo ho molti studenti "fuori corso") e sono d'accordo con Joan per quanto riguarda il fatto che in altri paesi (soprattutto anglofoni) questo nostro concetto italiano di "fuori corso" risulti alquanto strano - per non parlare della traduzione che in casi come il mio è proprio una vera scocciatura. Certo che in altri casi, anche le soluzioni che Tim ha fornito sono ottime. Per non parlare del tuo suggerimento (post #2: "university student who has not passed all his exams within the prescribed period of time.") e delle sue variazioni che poi sono le stesse espressioni che io ho sempre usato per tradurre "fuori corso" in altri contesti .

    Ho scelto "supplementary year" e sono contento di questa scelta in quanto qualche minuto fa ho sentito anche un amico professore universitario in UK e lui dice che secondo il loro sistema questa traduzione è quella che si avvicina di più al concetto italiano di "fuori corso".

    E ora per riderci sopra, un po' di esempi scovati sul web con le mie "valutazioni" tra parentesi:

    ...merito per l’accesso alle graduatorie per il primo anno fuori corso può essere utilizzato, in aggiunta ai crediti effettivamente... = ...merit level needed to enter the ranking for the first year fuori corso, a “bonus” of a maximum of 15 credits may be used in... (www.unibocconi.eu) (soluzione semplice: non hanno nemmeno tradotto!; bocciata!)

    ...eletti e possono votare tutti gli studenti, sia in corso che fuori corso, regolarmente iscritti ai corsi di laurea, ai corsi... = All students, whether “in corso” (in line with the course schedule) or “fuori corso” (behind in the course schedule), who are... (www.unipr.it) (soluzione "pensata": non offre una traduzione accurata per "in corso" e "fuori corso"; bocciata!)

    ...non si laurei in corso alla laurea triennale, ma prenda iscrizione al primo anno fuori corso, sarà inserito nella graduatoria come iscritto al primo anno fuori corso. = ...bachelor degree, but enrols in the first year outside the prescribed time, they will be entered in the ranking as enrolled in the first year outside the prescribed time. (www.unibg.it) (soluzione "super ragionata": non offre una traduzione accurata per "in corso" e "fuori corso"; bocciata!)

    Solo per puntualizzare, il Blackberry è stato ideato da un "fuori corso" dell'Università di Waterloo, Mike Lazaridis, il quale... = For the record, the Blackberry was in fact created by a "dropout" from the University of Waterloo, Mike Lazaridis, who... (www.italplanet.it) (soluzione strana: non mi sembra che "dropout" traduca "fuori corso" in quanto "dropout" significa ben altro; bocciata!)

    ...qualora gli stessi prendano iscrizione al I° anno fuori corso, verrà modificata d’ufficio con l’inserimento degli stessi nella posizione “fuori corso” =...if they enrol in the first year beyond the prescribed time, will be modified by the office with the insertion of these students in the position “beyond prescribed time” (www.unibg.it) (soluzione "super ragionata": non offre una traduzione accurata per "in corso" e "fuori corso"; bocciata!)

    E per concludere, ecco una spiegazione abbastanza divertente del concetto di "studente fuori corso":

    "Lo studente fuori corso è una minoranza etnica di cui fa parte la maggioranza degli studenti universitari. Continuamente bistrattato da chiunque, anche dalla propria famiglia, vive un'esistenza al limite della crisi isterica per via del cumulo di lavoro arretrato che deve svolgere sotto lo stress quotidiano che la società gli trasmette. Per usare una metafora calcistica, lo studente fuori corso è un mediano tecnicamente ipodotato su cui viene attuato un pressing alto. Una peculiarità che lo contraddistingue è che, ovunque vada, c'è sempre qualcuno che lo riconosce e gli domanda:
    «Quando ti laurei?»
    «E che :warn: cazzo :warn:, almeno salutare...»
    Lo studente fuori corso nasce come un essere umano normale. Nei primi anni di vita non emergono abilità particolari in lui, ma solo più tardi le sue vere doti vengono a galla: spiccano in particolare la maestria con cui riesce a sdraiarsi nel divano e il modo magistrale di fissare i pesci nell'acquario. Il momento più importante della sua vita avviene a 6 anni, quando viene mandato a scuola. Dalle sedi d'istruzione infatti non riuscirà più uscirne, al massimo cambiarle." (continua sul sito)

    Grazie a tutti per il vostro prezioso aiuto! :)
     

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    I think in the US we would simply say 'part-time student'. It may even be a badge of honor - if you graduated while working full time and raising a family, for instance, it'll look good on a resume, as opposed to those privileged kids and their Florida spring breaks.
     

    alicip

    Senior Member
    Italiano ITA-Romeno ROU-Inglese AmE
    I think in the US we would simply say 'part-time student'. It may even be a badge of honor - if you graduated while working full time and raising a family, for instance, it'll look good on a resume, as opposed to those privileged kids and their Florida spring breaks.
    Ciao Ody. Thanks for your input. :)
    Unfortunately, we have "part-time students" here as well. It's not the same thing as "studente fuori corso":
    Lo studente part-time è uno studente che si iscrive ad un corso di laurea o laurea magistrale con la possibilità di conseguire il titolo di studio in un tempo pari al doppio della durata normale dei corsi di studio e con un regime contributivo agevolato.
    Lo studente che intenda ottenere lo status di studente part-time in un anno successivo a quello di immatricolazione deve essere in regola con il pagamento delle tasse e dei contributi universitari per l’a.a. 2015/2016 e precedenti e non essere iscritto ad un anno fuori corso.
    http://www.unive.it/pag/8738/
    STUDENTE PART TIME = Chi è iscritto (non fuori corso) può scegliere un rapporto di studio a tempo parziale, iscrivendosi come “studente part-time”. È possibile così conseguire il titolo di studio in un maggiore arco di anni accademici, fino al doppio di quelli previsti, senza cadere nella condizione di fuori corso. In questo caso l'importo totale delle tasse è ridotto proporzionalmente a quanto dovuto. Lo studente part-time non può superare i crediti massimi previsti per ciascuna annualità (circa la metà, secondo quanto deliberato dai Consigli di Facoltà). Lo studente part-time è comunque tenuto al pagamento della prima rata che dovrà essere versata per intero.
    http://www.unite.it/UniTE/Engine/RAServePG.php/P/46681UTE0400/M/25191UTE0631
    Please see here as well:
    http://www.uniroma1.it/studenti/studente-fuori-corso
    http://www.uniroma1.it/didattica/regolamenti/part-time
    http://www.uniroma1.it/didattica/regolamenti/manifesto-degli-studi-regole-procedure-scadenze
     

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    I suppose it's the opposite of being a fast-track student.
    http://www.topuniversities.com/student-info/choosing-university/fast-track-degree-programs
    Maybe fuoricorso students should be dubbed 'slow-track' students.
    Yet, 'full-time student' is defined by completing a certain amount of credits in a semester, and the opposite is a 'part-time student'. I can't see how the details of the Italian system, or the judgment implied in Italy in the term 'fuori corso' students could change that.
     

    sorry66

    Senior Member
    English, England
    I suppose the main difference is that fuoricorso students have failed exams or not attended classes or not done the requisite coursework and that's the reason they take 'supplementary years' to get their degree. They've not chosen to be fuoricorso students from the outset.
    Part-time students, on the other hand, have actually chosen a lighter programme; it's officially supposed to be that way, and, therefore, not associated with 'failure'.
    Perhaps students who find themselves with the 'stigma' of being fuoricorso, with hindsight, may regret not having enrolled in an official part-time course in the first place.
     
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    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    I suppose the main difference is that fuoricorso students have failed exams or not attended classes or not done the requisite coursework and that's the reason they take 'supplementary years' to get their degree. They've not chosen to be fuoricorso students from the outset.
    Part-time students, on the other hand, have actually chosen a lighter programme; it's officially supposed to be that way, and, therefore, not associated with 'failure'.
    Perhaps students who find themselves with the 'stigma' of being fuoricorso, with hindsight, may regret not having enrolled in an official part-time course in the first place.
    That may be true in Italy, but, as far as I know, not in the US , where you can start as a part-time student or end up as one. Whether by design or by the effect of circumstances, the fiscal, insurance, financial implications of a longer than standard program are the same.

    If the two systems work differently, and on one side you have virtuous 'part-timers' and 'fuoricorso' douchebags, whereas on the other side you only have 'part-timers', the difficulty we have to find an exact English term for 'fuoricorso' is explained. The rare and obscure references that Alicip has found from the 60's, the 40's , the Middle Ages etc., do not really constitute proof of the existence of, or he need for, a current terminology, do they ?
     

    alicip

    Senior Member
    Italiano ITA-Romeno ROU-Inglese AmE
    Ciao Ody. Thanks again for your kind support. :)

    Well, my translation below has been accepted (by the translation agency, by the authorities who attested/certified it and by the Educational Institutions in UK and USA):
    (anno accademico) 2014/2015 iscrizione fuori corso al 1 anno del Corso di laurea in XXX presso l'università YYY.
    (academic year) 2014/2015 enrolled/registered in the 1st supplementary year of the degree course/program in XXX at YYY.

    Even though I believe the correct phrasing should have been:
    (academic year) 2014/2015 enrolled/registered in the 1st year, as a supplementary-year student, of the degree course/program in XXX at YYY.
    in English-speaking countries this makes little or no difference as only a few universities/colleges allow students to enroll/register as "supplementary year". The fact is that the concept of "fuori corso" and "supplementary year" are not exact cognates. My fellow professor from the UK told me it's the nearest translation I can get and I trust him - he has been in education for more than 50 years in both UK and USA! I have sent him the following translations as well:
    (academic year) 2014/2015 enrolled/registered in the 1st year, as a supplementary-year student, of the degree course/program in XXX at YYY.
    (academic year) 2014/2015 enrolled in/registered for the 1st year of the degree course/program in XXX at YYY as a supplementary-year student. (suggested by Sorry in PM - THANK YOU!)
    and he told me that these are slightly better but add nothing or little to my original translation if we look at the following "definition" of "supplementary year":
    "Students who have failed a unit/s (of up to 20 credit points in undergraduate modular programmes) and cannot progress to the next academic year. This normally would result from failing their end of year exams and the subsequent re-sit. -> (are allowed to) -> Register on supplementary year for the failed units and for additional study skills units as determined by the Faculty."
    http://www.bristol.ac.uk/academic-quality/assessment/annex/supplementaryyear.html

    In Italy one can start as a part-time student or end up as one too. So, for example you start as a "in corso" full-time student and you find a job. You may ask to pass to part-time later, say beginning 2nd year. The only difference is that in Italy you cannot enroll as a part-time student if you are "fuori corso". So, for example you start as "in corso" full-time student but you don't pass your compulsory exams and become a "fuori corso". Now you realize that you are "fuori corso" and, as Sorry says, may regret not having enrolled in an official part-time course in the first place, whether from the beginning or from say 2nd year. Here in Italy you can be "fuori corso" for as long as permitted by the law. So, until you manage to pass all those exams, you are allowed to enroll/register "fuori corso" in/for 1, 2, 3, etc. years.

    Here is what the University of Rome La Sapienza says:
    Art. 32 - Tipologie di "status" dello studente
    1. Lo studente è iscritto “in corso” per tutta la durata normale degli studi prevista dall’Ordinamento didattico del Corso di studi (es. 3 anni per i Corsi di laurea, 2 anni per le lauree magistrali).
    2. Lo studente è iscritto “fuori corso” qualora abbia seguito il proprio corso di studi per la sua intera durata senza tuttavia aver conseguito il titolo accademico o senza aver superato tutti gli esami necessari per l’ammissione all’esame finale.
    3. Lo studente è iscritto “ripetente” quando per il suo Corso di studio sono previste regole per il passaggio da un anno di corso all’anno successivo. Nel caso della condizione di studente “ripetente” le segreterie amministrative studenti, dopo il 31 gennaio di ogni anno, verificano le posizioni degli studenti iscritti ai Corsi di studio. Se, a seguito della verifica, la carriera non dovesse risultare coerente con le regole previste, la posizione dello studente verrà modificata d’ufficio, di norma entro il 28 febbraio, e lo studente sarà iscritto come “ripetente”.
    - See more at: http://www.uniroma1.it/node/5963#sthash.iuYl7tKX.dpuf
    Art. 33 - Termine di conseguimento del titolo di studio (per studenti di ordinamento DDMM 509/99 e 270/04)
    1. Gli studenti di ordinamento DM 270/04 o DM 509/99 fuori corso, iscritti a tempo pieno, devono superare le prove mancanti al completamento della propria carriera universitaria entro un termine pari al doppio della durata normale del Corso di studio, se non altrimenti stabilito dai regolamenti didattici di Facoltà. Esempio: uno studente iscritto ad un Corso di laurea deve superare le prove previste dal suo corso entro 3 anni (durata normale del Corso) + 6 (il doppio della durata normale), quindi entro 9 anni complessivi.
    2. Gli studenti di ordinamento DM 270/04 o DM 509/99 fuori corso iscritti al tempo parziale devono superare le prove mancanti al completamento della propria carriera universitaria entro un termine pari alla durata concordata del proprio percorso formativo. Esempio: se la durata concordata è di 4 anni, le prove vanno completate entro 4 anni (durata concordata) + 4 (termine pari alla durata concordata) quindi entro 8 anni complessivi.
    - See more at: http://www.uniroma1.it/node/5966#sthash.PnBt3VRO.dpuf
    Art. 37 - Norme per gli studenti fuori corso per l'a.a. 2015-2016
    1. Tutti gli studenti che per l’a.a. 2015-2016 si iscrivono fuori corso a partire dal terzo anno in poi dovranno versare tasse con una maggiorazione del 50% rispetto alla misura prevista. Per non incorrere nella maggiorazione, tali studenti potranno passare al regime di tempo parziale di cui all’art. 24 del presente Manifesto o effettuare il cambio di ordinamento di cui all’art.38, se ancora afferenti all’ordinamento DM 509/99. Questa disposizione è conforme alla delibera del Consiglio di Amministrazione del 19 aprile 2011.
    - See more at: http://www.uniroma1.it/node/5975#sthash.Tb5blq7G.dpuf

    So, here at La Sapienza where I teach, a student becomes "fuori corso" after 3 years (if the stundent chose full-time) or after say 4/5 years (if the student chose part-time in 4/5 years). In the first case, the student is allowed to enroll/register as "fuori corso" for 6 more years (in order for them to pass all the exams they failed or didn't take/attempt during those 3 years). In the second, the student is allowed to enroll/register as "fuori corso" for 4 more years (in order for them to pass all the exams they failed or didn't take/attempt during those 4 years). If the students don't want to become "fuori corso" (fees are 50% higher), they may ask to pass to "part-time" whenever they want (in accordance with the laws and regulations).

    Hope this helps. :)
     

    sorry66

    Senior Member
    English, England
    So if students were more realistic about what they can achieve, they should ask to go 'part-time' if they fail exams, rather than face the stigma of being 'fuori corso' for too long, but, I suppose, they are ever hopeful of getting their degree at the earliest possible time.
    (By the way, my suggestion was for either 'enrolled in' or 'registered for' but it's a small point.)
    Clearly, the system is more flexible than in the UK, where there are (or rather 'were', as I don't know about now) a lot of dropouts (nearly half) after the first year, but it has its own disadvantages, if the different types of enrolment create a pecking order among graduates.
    However, I don't think you're ever going to stop people favouring graduates who get their degrees in the shortest possible time.
     

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    Very exhaustive description, Alicip. It will be very useful for whoever will need to translate the term in the future. Thanks.

    Thinking about it, I guess the real difference is that in the US we pay through the nose as we go whether we are full- or part-timers. (scholarships do exist, but for the really deserving) The Italian public colleges being a lot cheaper, and subsidized with public money, it does make sense that the system deal with the slackers by increasing the fees and with a measure of disapproval.
     

    alicip

    Senior Member
    Italiano ITA-Romeno ROU-Inglese AmE
    Very exhaustive description, Alicip. It will be very useful for whoever will need to translate the term in the future. Thanks.

    Thinking about it, I guess the real difference is that in the US we pay through the nose as we go whether we are full- or part-timers. (scholarships do exist, but for the really deserving) The Italian public colleges being a lot cheaper, and subsidized with public money, it does make sense that the system deal with the slackers by increasing the fees and with a measure of disapproval.
    Thank you Ody! :) Well, my intention was to point out that even though there are many differences between our educational systems (Italy, UK, USA, Canada, australia, etc.), there must be always (or almost always) a way (be it short or long) to translate a concept (be it strange and complicated as "fuori corso" is) into another language. I'm sure you have read my post where I said that I didn't even translate the word "in corso" - it would have been useless to translate it (at least according to my fellows professors from UK and USA). And you're right about the fees - here public colleges/universities are a lot cheaper. Nevertheless, I still don't understand why a student needs 3 years to graduate while others need 9 years - this beats me! I have many "fuori corso" students (unfortunately) attending my classes, but never asked them why do they need so many years to graduate. And I won't ever ask them.
     
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