study 'at /in' school

Moninha

New Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Which is the right sentence?
We studied at a small school in the neighborhood.
or
We studied in a small school in the neighborhood.
Thanks.
 
  • Imber Ranae

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    There's a difference in meaning. "Studied at" means that you are enrolled in the school and regularly attend classes there, whereas "studied in" merely suggests that you study (i.e. do research/homework/etc.) somewhere inside the building. I think the latter is what you intend for your sentence.
     

    Moninha

    New Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    The sentence is part of a small text in which I should find a certain number of mistakes. As I have found all other mistakes, I thought that in the sentence I quoted I should use "in" instead of "at" (as it is in the text), since the school is not specified/defined (ex: I studied at St. Patrick school). It would be any school (I studied in a small school).
    Could it be?
     

    Imber Ranae

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I won't pretend to speak authoritatively, but I would still expect "at" even for an unnamed school if the meaning of "studied" is "attending/enrolled in".
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    More help might be found here: study the lesson in / at the school.

    Oi, Moninha, if you would give us more of the text, we should be able to verify which is the most appropriate.
    If one is enrolled at [or in] a school, then at is probably the better choice.


    ______________________
    Bemvinda ao fórum, Moninha
     
    Last edited:

    kitenok

    Senior Member
    I agree with Imber's post above, Monhinha. "Studied in" only shifts the emphasis to the building itself as the location of the studying. I don't think there are any errors in the original sentence with "at."

    And one thing I forgot in my first post - welcome to the forums!
     

    YPY

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Latin American)
    Hello. It's me again.

    The context is a strange "story" that I'm writing :)

    "Three little dogs that studied in (or at?) one of the schools were sick and tired of the (or this?) situation..."

    Is it ok?

    Thanks in advance
     

    YPY

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Latin American)
    Thanks.

    By the way, could I use "whom" instead of "that"?

    Three little dogs whom...
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    If you are going to tell the story as if the dogs are people - from the dogs' point of view - use who (not whom).

    To use "at" or "in"? It doesn't matter a great deal, but if you are concerned about this we would need to know:
    What kind of school?
    Which country?
     

    YPY

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Latin American)
    Thanks

    Well, it's just a fake elementary school in a fake world :)
     

    mahau

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian
    Hello,

    Please help me. What preposition should I use with "school"("at" OR "in")? I find both. I know "study at university".
    Or it depends on context?

    Thank you!
     

    Xander2024

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In the US, either would be correct.

    Wouldn't it be more correct and natural to use "to be at/in school" or "to go to school"? I remember reading somewhere that "to study" is not advisable to use when referring to smb's studies at an educational institution. Or am I mistaken?:eek:

     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Over here both options sound as good as each other....

    "Oh and since when did you know so much about the Indo-European migrations?"
    "I studied it in school."
    "I studied it at school."


    Both fine :)
     

    mahau

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian
    Wouldn't it be more correct and natural to use "to be at/in school" or "to go to school"? I remember reading somewhere that "to study" is not advisable to use when referring to smb's studies at an educational institution. Or am I mistaken?:eek:

    You can only "be" at/in school and you can "study". Two different meanings? :)
     

    Xander2024

    Senior Member
    Russian
    As far as I can make out, you can use "to study" if you study something on your own, or if you go thouroughly into a question, trying to master a subject etc. But when referring to an educational institution, one should use "to be a school student/college student" etc. That's what I've been told by a native speaker.
     
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