Stylish, Classy, Elegant, Chic

Dunno123

Senior Member
Slovak
Hello. Please, could you tell me what's the subtle difference between these words (in relation to clothes)?

To me stylish implies something has a lot of style and therefore is attractive, classy is more connected with something being expensive and perfect, elegant being smooth and attractive because of its simplicity and chic I have no idea about. Did I get any of that right? What's your opinion on the difference between them?

Thank you a lot for your answers.
 
  • I agree with the above but think that "chic" can transcend up-to-date and transcends expensive (although it can mean that) but somehow captures an idea of "very well put together in clothes and accessories, or lack of distracting garish accessories, perfectly and seemingly effortlessly done." Just the right old but beautiful scarf, just the right square-shaped man's watch (like Jackie Kennedy popularized wearing). Old clothes, cheap clothes, this era, that era, it doesn't matter, the look is workin'! :D
     

    Dunno123

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    What about the words "swanky", "ritzy" and "posh", could you differentiate them in any way for me, please?
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    Stylish doesn't have to mean "attractive." All kinds of truly ugly clothes can be stylish at certain times. I don't want to name specific styles because I don't want to offend anybody, but I'm sure you've seen clothes that were very much in style but that you still considered unattractive.

    To me chic is a synonym of stylish. If there's a subtle difference, I am not aware of it.

    And the same is true for classy and elegant - they mean the same thing to me, and that is fashion that transcends whatever's stylish right at the moment. The only real difference is that elegant is a more formal word than classy - which is pretty informal.

    Swanky, ritzy and posh are seldom used in reference to clothes. I would never describe any clothing that way. But all three mean pretty much the same thing to me, which is "luxurious and (usually) elegant."
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top