Subject complement

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vladv

Senior Member
Russian-Russia
What makes life dreary is the want of a motive.is subject complement the same as predicate in this sentence? Are subject complements always predicates , or maybe there are exceptions .
 
  • SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish/AE
    What makes life dreary is the want of a motive.is subject complement the same as predicate in this sentence? Are subject complements always predicates , or maybe there are exceptions .
    As always, it starts with your chosen terminology. "Predicate" is commonly defined as everything that isn't "subject," or everything that is "asserted" of the subject. So, once you've identified your (grammatical) subject, everything else becomes the "predicate" (which includes the verb). If this answers your question, stop here. If you want a broader perspective, continue on.

    I suspect (many/most/all) linguists don't recognize the terms "predicate" and "subject complement," or at least have serious issues with their definitions. Simply put, those terms don't stand up well to scrutiny. For example, in There is a naked woman in my kitchen, the subject is "There," and the "predicate" is everything else. But can anything be "asserted" of this (grammatical) "subject"? There shows up entirely due to a syntactic process known as There insertion. Terms such as "predicate" and "subject complement" appear in textbooks for a general audience, such as school students. It's not really how linguists talk about syntax.
     

    vladv

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    As always, it starts with your chosen terminology. "Predicate" is commonly defined as everything that isn't "subject," or everything that is "asserted" of the subject. So, once you've identified your (grammatical) subject, everything else becomes the "predicate" (which includes the verb). If this answers your question, stop here. If you want a broader perspective, continue on.

    I suspect (many/most/all) linguists don't recognize the terms "predicate" and "subject complement," or at least have serious issues with their definitions. Simply put, those terms don't stand up well to scrutiny. For example, in There is a naked woman in my kitchen, the subject is "There," and the "predicate" is everything else. But can anything be "asserted" of this (grammatical) "subject"? There shows up entirely due to a syntactic process known as There insertion. Terms such as "predicate" and "subject complement" appear in textbooks for a general audience, such as school students. It's not really how linguists talk about syntax.
    Could you provide a list of the sites where linguists talk about syntax ?
     
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