Subject + Verb + Object + Complement

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kna

Member
English-UK
Take these two sentences:

1) James/ has made /the garden/ lovely.

2) George /buried /his wife /under the patio.

Do they belong to:

a) Subject + Verb + Object + Complement

or

b) Subject + Verb + Object + Adjective

I can't seem to figure out the difference between ...object + complement and ...object + adjective. Any ideas?

Would 'James has made a lovely garden' on the other hand have the form/structure Subject + Verb + adjective + object? Of course, this would mean something different to 'James has made the garden lovely'.
 
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  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I'd say that "lovely" is the object complement in 1).
    "Under the patio" in 2) is a prepositional phrase.
    I assume we are talking about the parts of the sentence and not the parts of speech and adjectives belong to the latter.
     

    kna

    Member
    English-UK
    I'd say that "lovely" is the object complement in 1).
    "Under the patio" in 2) is a prepositional phrase.
    I assume we are talking about the parts of the sentence and not the parts of speech and adjectives belong to the latter.
    For b), my printed notes (on 7 basic sentence or clause patterns) just said S + V + O + A.

    Now I'm thinking (because of what's mentioned here) that the 'A' is for adverbial.

    could 'under the patio' be an adverbial?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It could be "adjunct": it isn't essential to complete the sentence.

    The adjective in the first sentence is a complement.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Do they belong to:

    a) Subject + Verb + Object + Complement

    or

    b) Subject + Verb + Object + Adjective
    The answer is "Both" - an adjective can be a complement.

    1) James/ has made /the garden/ a mess. <- a mess (noun) is the complement.
     
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