subject

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Are the two sentences the same or different?
1. Police subjected him to hours of questioning.
2. Police subjected him to questioning for hours.
Thanks.
 
  • mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    You don't like them. Can you give me your suggestion. Yes, I would like to know different ways of writing from the same thing.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    You says:"I don't prefer either one".
    How do I have to understand it. Can you rewrite it?
     

    Giordano Bruno

    Senior Member
    English, England
    Mimi,

    Gaer is only saying that he likes them both equally. For my part, it is only a matter of preference. Neither is wrong.
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    Giordano.
    I know that Gaer likes both of my sentences but the way of Gaer writing made me confused. I would like to know the way of Gaer's writing. Do you understand what I mean?
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Giordano.
    I know that Gaer likes both of my sentences but the way of Gaer writing made me confused. I would like to know the way of Gaer's writing. Do you understand what I mean?
    In English, these MAY be the same:

    I have no preference.
    I like both.

    However, if you say the first (I have no preference), you should add: "Both seem fine to me."

    It is possible to interpret "no preference" as "not caring", which was not my meaning. :)
     
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