submarine disease

Jana337

Senior Member
čeština
I am looking for a word that would capture the mutual irritation that invariably sets in among people who (have to) spend a lenghty span of time together, deprived of privacy, grating on each other's nerves, angry about minor things (this does not have to be involuntary; you may e.g. hear that a rock group has split because of the-word-I-am-looking-for).

Why the thread is called submarine disease? Well, I had to give a name, so I just translated literally what we call it in my mother tongue. Quite apt, isn't it?

Jana
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    There are a couple of AE terms:
    Cabin fever
    Claustrophobia

    The first is far closer to your query. The second describes the way many people react to a submarine or other tight enclosure.

    saludos,
    Cuchu
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Hi Cuchu,

    thanks for the reply. However, both expressions that you suggested seem to stress the lack of space rather than the permanent presence of the same people. Consider this definiton of cabin fever from the Cambridge dictionary:

    when you feel angry and bored because you have been inside for too long: The rain had kept me indoors all weekend and I was beginning to get cabin fever

    Am I wrong?

    Jana
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Jana337 said:
    Hi Cuchu,

    thanks for the reply. However, both expressions that you suggested seem to stress the lack of space rather than the permanent presence of the same people. Consider this definiton of cabin fever from the Cambridge dictionary:

    when you feel angry and bored because you have been inside for too long: The rain had kept me indoors all weekend and I was beginning to get cabin fever

    Am I wrong?

    Jana
    You are not wrong. I cannot think of a single English term to describe what you are asking for. Perhaps if you and I and ten more foreros were to spend a weekend together, in a small cabin, while it's raining very hard, we would come up with a solution.:)
     

    atlantaguy33

    Member
    USA English
    There is the term "stir crazy." It was originally used to describe prisoners who go a little bonkers. But now it applies to anyone stuck in a situation with people that makes them go a little crazy.

    I am reminded of Sartre's "No Exit"--hell is each other.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    atlantaguy33 said:
    There is the term "stir crazy." It was originally used to describe prisoners who go a little bonkers. But now it applies to anyone stuck in a situation with people that makes them go a little crazy.
    This word is new to me, thanks! However, according to the Cambridge dict. you do not need other people to go stir-crazy (they hyphen it):

    upset or angry because you have been prevented from going somewhere or doing something for a long time:
    I've been laid up for two weeks with this broken leg and I'm beginning to go stir-crazy

    Jana
     

    atlantaguy33

    Member
    USA English
    You are correct with the hyphen. My mistake! I don't know if there is an exact English equal to your term. But if I wanted to express my need to get away from others, I'd say "I need some alone time!" or "I need a little me time!" Actually I say that often and I never get anywhere near a submarine! :)
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    It isn't a traditional expression, but I personally refer to it as "annoying overfamiliarity."
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Jana337 said:
    Not bad at all! Thanks,

    Jana
    Jana,

    The literal translation of your own idiom is great. It fills a language vacuum and to me is a merging of "cabin fever" and "claustrophobia". But it also includes the idea of several (or many) people.

    This is why English suddenly has words that don't sound English at all—like Doppelgänger, Schdenfreude. They drop the special characters and capitals.

    Think also of naïve, déjà vu. What is your word. Can you give it to us, in your native language? :)

    Gaer
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    gaer said:
    Think also of naïve, déjà vu. What is your word. Can you give it to us, in your native language? :)

    Gaer
    It is "ponorková nemoc". I do not believe, however, that it will take root in English. :)
    Czech words, with the exception of "robot", are far too complicated for your mouths. ;)

    Jana
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    gaer said:
    The literal translation of your own idiom is great. It fills a language vacuum
    I totally agree with this. This concept would really deserve an expression of its own in English (and other languages, I don't think there's a French equivalent). I suggest that we make it up here and now :)
    submarine disease seems fine, or rather submarine syndrome. ? Or even stronger : the space-capsule syndrom:D
    Well, of course, this doesn't solve your problem, Jana337.:eek:
     
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