submarine <sails?>

  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    To sail is usually avoided in preference for "patrol, hunt, glide, lurk, be, slip through, etc. But submarines "sail/set sail for <insert place> in the way that we still "dial" numbers on phones that have no dial..."
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    As PaulQ says, submarines are often said to 'sail', but in many contexts a different verb is preferred.

    If you have a sentence in mind, you should post it here. :)
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I'm pretty sure that RM1(SS)'s avatar is a badge worn by people who have qualified to serve on submarines in the U.S. Navy. So if he actually holds that badge, he knows what the normal usage is.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:
    Nuclear reactors just produce heat; they can't turn drive shafts by themselves. You'll find that all marine nuclear propulsion uses that heat... to produce steam to drive steam turbines. :)
    Yep - nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers are just high-tech steamships.

    One of the required things in the log entry at midnight every day when a sub* is at sea is "Miles steamed: XXX" (XXX being the number of miles the boat traveled that day).


    * Probably a surface ship as well, but I've no experience there.
     
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