Submit the bis

4356

Senior Member
Russian
Hi. Does the sentence below mean those on the stage gave an additional performance? Did the audience ask them for it? There is virtually no context.

They submitted the bis in good time.
 
  • srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    From our dictionary for "bis"
    2. again (used interjectionally as an enthusiastic call for the repetition of a musical performance).

    (I always thought I was yelling "encore.")

    Edit: I am familiar with it as sheet-music notation, at the end of a passage, to indicate that the passage is to be repeated.
     
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    Minnesota Guy

    Senior Member
    American English - USA
    Could this be a typo? "They submitted the bids/bios in good time"?

    Even if bis were the normal word for an encore at a concert, "They submitted the bis in good time" doesn't feel idiomatic.
     

    Laurentiana

    Member
    English - Canada
    I’ve never seen it in English. In French street addresses it’s the equivalent of A, as in 12bis rue X = 12A X Street. The same idea but no, certainly not in common usage.
     
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    4356

    Senior Member
    Russian
    It is from The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.

    Entry 2, Sense 2. in good time

    Now, given your kind replies, I doubt that it is an encore at all.
     

    S1m0n

    Senior Member
    English
    Could this be a typo? "They submitted the bids/bios in good time"?
    This suggestion is looking more and more likely. I think there's a typo or an OCR error in the dictionary's sample sentence. No dictionary would include a completely obscure word in a sample sentence that's not about that word.
     
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    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    The WR dictionary AE part gives the meaning shown in post #3 (which I have never heard).

    But the BE part gives a meaning that I've seen before:
    twice; for a second time (used in musical scores to indicate a part to be repeated)

    In piano music, I've seen the abbreviation "bis" which means "play this part again". I have no idea what language it is.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    This entire thread has been a waste of everyone's time. If one looks at the source, and copies it correctly, the original sentence was "They submitted the bids in good time."

    https://epdf.pub/the-american-heritage-dictionary-of-idioms.html

    The word "bis" does not appear in the original at all. To place "bis" in the sentence is an error of transcription that turns the original sentence into meaningless babble, and which causes needless confusion.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    To be fair, if you follow the post 9 link to idioms/thefreedictionary/ingood time, what you find is the sentence as written in post 1, complete with "bis". So the error lies in the free dictionary's reproduction of the example from the American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms.

    Many thanks to GWB for showing what the sentence was in the original.
     
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