, <such as> I have never seen since

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The protagonist recalls his childhood.
He and Peggotty, the only maid of his house came to Yarmouth, her hometown and visited the house of her brother.

The tray was kept from tumbling down by a bible, and the tray, if it had tumbled down, would have smashed a quantity of cups and saucers and a teapot that were grouped around the book. On the walls there were some common coloured pictures, framed and glazed, of scripture subjects, such as I have never seen since, in the hands of pedlars, without seeing the whole interior of Peggotty's brother's house again, at one view.
[David Copperfield by Charles Dickens]
I'd like to know if I can replace "such as" as "for example" here.
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • Kwistax

    Senior Member
    français - Belgique
    no.

    all the objects he has seen in the house, he see them all, at times, in the hands of pedlars and they all remind him always of Peggotty's interior (that was full of the same kind of objects).
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Kwistax, for your very helpful answer. :)
    Then I was wondering if I can rephrase "such as I have never seen since, in the hands of pedlars, without seeing the whole interior of Peggotty's brother's house again, at one view." as the following:
    "as I have never seen such since, in the hands of pedlars, without visualizing the whole interior of Peggotty's brother's house again, at one view."

    And I can't figure out what role "as" plays or what it means.
     

    Kwistax

    Senior Member
    français - Belgique
    to understand, you may want to separate such and as

    There were some objects/ such (the word refers to all those obects)/ as I have never seen (them/such)/ in the hands of pedlars

    natives will confirm I guess... with more precise pieces of info.

    Truth be told, had I to write the same sentence, I'd have said:
    such as I have never seen them (or their kinds) since,
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Whenever he has since seen similar pictures of scripture subjects in the hands of pedlars, he is reminded of that house and can see it all again in his mind's eye.

    "Such as" means "of the kind that"
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, velisarius, for another very kind answer from you. :)
    Then I was wondering if "as" means "in the way which" in "such as" and "such as" leads a noun phrase.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    They were "such pictures (or such scripture subjects) as he never saw again without..."

    It means he never saw again that type of picture (such pictures). "As" here means "that" (relative pronoun).


    Edit: Compare with this, from 1813:
    In the second place, that his disciple may ask such things as are expedient for him...
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I'm so sorry for my tardy question. :(
    But I was wondering if "such as I have never seen since, in the hands of pedlars, without seeing the whole interior of Peggotty's brother's house again, at one view." is a long nominal phrase.
     
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