such larks as were abroad

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Ahmed Samir Darwish

Senior Member
Arabic
From the beginning of chapter 10 of The Just Men of Cordova (1917) by Edgar Wallace, the author was describing someone, saying:

But he certainly lived like a gentleman, as all Somers Town agreed, for he went to bed at whatsoever hour he chose, arose with such larks as were abroad at the moment, or stayed in bed reading his favourite journal.

I found that "rise with the lark" means " wake up with sunrise", but I can't get the whole meaning of this bolded statement.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    He arose at any time of day. I only know of skylarks, but they sing all day long, from before dawn till after sunset in the springtime. I imagine that the expression "up with the lark" derives from when skylarks start to sing, but Wallace has changed it to mean at any time.

    Abroad = up and about. The implication here is out of the nest (or wherever they live) and singing.
     

    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    arose with such larks as were abroad at the moment,
    woke up with birds he couldn't actually hear (because they were in another country)
     

    Ahmed Samir Darwish

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    He arose at any time of day. I only know of skylarks, but they sing all day long, from before dawn till after sunset in the springtime. I imagine that the expression "up with the lark" derives from when skylarks start to sing, but Wallace has changed it to mean at any time.

    Abroad = up and about. The implication here is out of the nest (or wherever they live) and singing.
    So what did he mean by "at the moment"? if he mean "at any time"?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    arose with such larks as were abroad at the moment,
    woke up with birds he couldn't actually hear (because they were in another country)
    No. This is wrong. In this context, "abroad" means "in the area."
    Yes, the older meaning of abroad is out of doors. Therefore, out and about; and therefore, in the vicinity.
     
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