Sudoku

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J.F. de TROYES

Senior Member
francais-France
I don't know Japanese and I read that this word is a kind of abbreviation of the following sentence: "Suji wa dokushin ni kagirua".
What do you think about ? Is this sentence correct and this explanation right ?
Thanks a lot for your anwers.
 
  • Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Sudoku (< Jp. Sūdoku) is an abbreviation of "sūji-wa dokushin-ni kagiru" or "We like numbers best in celibacy." This is the catch copy used by the puzzle company to explain the rule of placing numbers: A number should be used only once in the vertical and horizontal lines and in the squarre being marked by bold grids. The Japanese word is pronounced with a long and weak U; /sɯɯdoku/. I'd imagine different languages read it differently.
     

    J.F. de TROYES

    Senior Member
    francais-France
    Sudoku (< Jp. Sūdoku) is an abbreviation of "sūji-wa dokushin-ni kagiru" or "We like numbers best in celibacy." This is the catch copy used by the puzzle company to explain the rule of placing numbers: A number should be used only once in the vertical and horizontal lines and in the squarre being marked by bold grids. The Japanese word is pronounced with a long and weak U; /sɯɯdoku/. I'd imagine different languages read it differently.
    I'd like to ask you what you mean when using the phrase "catch copy"; is it a kind of promotional text ?
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Yes, I meant it is like a promotional text. The puzzle has been around since the 80s. It might be that 「数字は独身に限る」 (sūji-wa dokushin-ni kagiru) was the original name but today the puzzle company call it 数独 (sūdoku) and the longer name is always referred to as what 数独 is abbreviated from.
     

    almostfreebird

    Senior Member
    Born and raised in Japón, soy japonés
    I realized why I didn't know the word.

    <<The puzzle was called "Number Place". In 1984 it started to run in a Japanese magazine. Originally it was called nanpure, but eventually became known as Sudoku, which means, literally, "single number." (The magazine copyrighted the name, which is why in Japan it is usually called nanpure or "Number Place". Only in places outside of Japan is it called sudoku).>> quoted from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Sudoku#Early_History_of_Sudoku
     
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