'Suffer' in passive form

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phantomwalker

New Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
Is it okay to use 'suffer' in the passive form, as in the following sentences?

1) He is suffered from fever. (Intended meaning: He is having a fever.)
2) A physical injury is suffered.

I thought the subject of a passive sentence should be the 'recipient' of the action, until I came across expressions like 'someone is suffered from..." I'd like to ask if that is grammatical.

Thanks a lot!
 
  • Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    1 - no. This almost sounds like the fever is suffering from him.
    2 - yes, but why would you want to?

    You can put almost anything into passive voice:
    A fever is suffered from by him.
    During the polo match, a broken nose was suffered by Jones.

    But most of the time putting sentences into passive voice just sounds odd.
     

    phantomwalker

    New Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    1 - no. This almost sounds like the fever is suffering from him.
    2 - yes, but why would you want to?

    You can put almost anything into passive voice:
    A fever is suffered from by him.
    During the polo match, a broken nose was suffered by Jones.

    But most of the time putting sentences into passive voice just sounds odd.
    I see. Thank you very much!
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I came across expressions like 'someone is suffered from..." I'd like to ask if that is grammatical.
    "Someone is suffering from (a disease)." This is not a passive of course, but the present continuous active form of the verb. You may have been misled by the fact that the meaning is similar to a passive. (I might try to rephrase it as "He is being made to suffer by a fever", but we would not use this version.)

    He is suffering from fever.
     

    phantomwalker

    New Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    "Someone is suffering from (a disease)." This is not a passive of course, but the present continuous active form of the verb. You may have been misled by the fact that the meaning is similar to a passive. (I might try to rephrase it as "He is being made to suffer by a fever", but we would not use this version.)

    He is suffering from fever.
    Thanks for your reply! I too thought "someone is suffered from" is a mistaken form of "someone is suffering from..." when I came across it, but then my Google search for "he is suffered from" returned 48500 results, so I thought maybe there's something I've missed ;)
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Don't believe the number at the top of the first page of a Google search result. Keep clicking through to the next page until you get to the last page - 83 actual results is not 48,500. And many of those 83 are written by people whose first language is not English.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thanks for your reply! I too thought "someone is suffered from" is a mistaken form of "someone is suffering from..." when I came across it, but then my Google search for "he is suffered from" returned 48500 results, so I thought maybe there's something I've missed ;)
    By clicking through to the last page of results, I get an actual number of 84 results, none of which seem to have been written by native English speakers.

    Crossposted with Andygc.
     
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