'sugar stick' and 'stick sugar'

keeley_h

Senior Member
Bulgarian
Hi everybody,

Are the following expressions correct?
sugar stick
stick sugar

What's the difference in meaning?
Which is more common?
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hi Keeley.

    sugar stick = a stick that is made out of sugar
    stick sugar = sugar that comes in the form of a stick

    I've never heard of either of them so can't say if they're correct ... or meaningful ... or common ... or anything at all, really.
     

    keeley_h

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Oh, yes. That's what I'm talking about, GretchenPlay. Thanks.
    So it's sugar stick, not stick sugar, right?

    But according to ewie's definition, it can also be stick sugar, I think.
    Why isn't it stick sugar?
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Both of ewie's descriptions sound like some sort of candy to me like an unflavored peppermint stick.
    Gretchen's picture is a sugar packet that's an unusual shape. I have seen them but I've never heard anyone mention a special name. (Hey, look at these cute sugar packets!)
    Also, the packets in Gretchen's picture are blue which in the US would mean that they are aspartame/Nutra-sweet/Equal - an artificial sweetner not sugar. White packets are sugar, pink for sacchrine, and yellow for Splenda.
     

    Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi.
    We see that kind of things, very often, both "real sugar" and "artificial sweet things", in Japan.
    We call it (the real sugar) as "stick sugar" in Japan. Though Japan is not English speaking country.

    Wishfull
     

    keeley_h

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Thanks, Packard. Yes, that's what I'm talking about.

    Can I ask another question?

    Are the following expressions correct?
    sugar cube
    cube sugar

    What's the difference in meaning?
    Which is more common?
     

    GretchenPlay

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, NZE
    I'd say there's no real difference in meaning, but sugar cube is the common way of saying it, just as sugar stick is the common way of describing those thin packets of sugar (which are very common in NZ and Australia).
     

    keeley_h

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Thanks, GretchenPlay.
    I see.

    I think the final/ultimate meaning of sugar cube is cube. In sugar cube, sugar is the modifier and less important than cube. So cube is the most important word.
    I think the final/ultimate meaning of cube sugar is sugar. In cube sugar, cube is the modifier and less important than sugar. So sugar is the most important word.

    When you talk about the substans called sugar cube, I think the most important fact that you should tell is that the substans is sugar, not cube.

    For example, suppose you have sugar cubes in your hand and are talking with a one year old kid, the follwoing conversation might be possible.
    Kid: What?
    You: Sugar.

    You might say sugar, not cube. I think that's because sugar is the most important word when talking about the substance called sugar cube.

    Any way, I think sugar is the most important word when talking about the substance called sugar cube. So I think cube sugar should be used instead of sugar cube.

    But according to GretchenPlay, it is incorrect to use cube sugar instead of sugar cube.
    What's the incorrect point of my thought above? Or why am I wrong? Or where in my thought above did I make mistakes?
     
    Last edited:

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    What's the incorrect point of my thought above? Or why am I wrong? Or where in my thought above did I make mistakes?
    I think most of your reasoning is fine. What I'm not sure about is your opinion that "sugar is the most important word when talking about the substance called sugar cube." I think what word is the most important one depends. Your example with the kid is a good one, because when you're that young it may be more important to learn the word sugar than cube. But if you were to present a sugar cube to an older kid, who is already familiar with the word and substance sugar, and who is presently learning words of different shapes, he'd probably answer "cube" rather than "sugar."
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    You say cube sugar when you want to contrast it to granulated sugar, eg 'Can you pick up some sugar please? Not loose sugar but cube sugar.' 'I put out some cube sugar for the guests coming' (implicit contrast).

    Otherwise, 'sugar cube' would be more common.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    You say cube sugar when you want to contrast it to granulated sugar, eg 'Can you pick up some sugar please? Not loose sugar but cube sugar.' 'I put out some cube sugar for the guests coming' (implicit contrast).

    Otherwise, 'sugar cube' would be more common.
    I think you have to say "cubed sugar" and not "cube sugar".
     
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