sukkar qandi

Qcumber

Senior Member
UK English
Everybody knows that the two words of the modern Arabic expression sukkar qandi
سكرقندي
"candy sugar" come a long way from Sanskrit.
I'd like to know in what category of words native speakers of Arabic put qandi قندي ? Do they see it like hindi
هندي
"Indian" i.e. an adjective or a noun of origin although I don't think there is any country named qand ?
 
  • Heba

    Senior Member
    Egypt, Arabic
    Hi Qcumber:)

    I've never heard the word قندي used as a translation for candy. I never hear it in everyday language and have never heard it used in modern standard arabic. Maybe it is not originally arabic .Unfortunately, I do not have a good dictinary of standard arabic to which we can refer. I guess Cherine will help us make sure wether the word is originally arabic or not.

    I made a search and found out that there is a city in Uzbakistan that bears the name ''Samar qand''- سمرقند. This city was captured by the Muslims in the year 93 AH (AL-Hijra)- 709 AD. The second part of the name- قند - means ''city'' in Persian.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    I guess Cherine will help us make sure wether the word is originally arabic or not.
    Thanks for the trust Heba, but I'm not really sure about this subject.

    Qcumber said:
    Everybody knows that the two words of the modern Arabic expression sukkar qandi سكرقندي "candy sugar" come a long way from Sanskrit.
    I'd like to know in what category of words native speakers of Arabic put qandi قندي ? Do they see it like hindi هندي Indian" i.e. an adjective or a noun of origin although I don't think there is any country named qand ?
    You start by a confirmation (!) but you can count me -at least- out of those "Everybody".
    The word qandi doesn't ring any bells to me, I can't assimilate it to India or another country. But if you ask about country names, I thought of قندهار , Heba gave Samarcande, there maybe other countries/cities with Qand in their names.

    Maybe others can help you more with this.
     

    Qcumber

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Sorry, Cherine, Heba, I thought this was common knowledge. Arabs / Muslims transmitted plenty of Indian things to the West including the ten digits, and ...
    1) Sanskrit sharkara शर्कर "gravel; ground sugar" > Arabic sukkar سُكَّر "sugar".
    2) Sanskrit khaNDAva खण्डव "sugar-candy" > Arabic qand
    قَنْد"sugar candy".

    The latter term is in my dictionaries:
    Hans WEHR (Cowan 1971:792)
    KAZIMIRSKY (1860:II:820)

    I saw qandi
    قَنْدِي
    this year so I suppose it is the English term candy that was borrowed and reattached to its Arabic stem.
     

    SofiaB

    Senior Member
    English Asia
    from lisan al arab but it is not a common word. Many words are in dictionaries but unkown to many speakers.
    قند - القَنْد عسل قصب السُكَّر إذا جُمِّد وقد جاءَ في شعر فصيح قالهُ ابن دُرَيد ويقال هو فارسيٌّ معرَّب ج قُنُود
    القُنْدَانِ الخصيانِ وكنّي الأصمعيُّ أبا القُنْدَينِ لعظم قُنْدَيْهِ
    القَنْدَة القَنْد.
    وقَندَة الرقاع تمرٌ
    سويقٌ
    مَقْنُودٌ ومُقنَّدٌ أي معمول بالقَنْد
     

    Qcumber

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Thanks a lot, SofiaB. So sukkar is common, but qand is not. Now, how do people say "sugar-candy" in Arabic?

    P.S.1. Father NAKHLA (a Lebanese) does translate French candi by qand قند
    pl. qunuud قنود
    so concurs with the Arabic-English / French dictionaries I mentioned.

    P.S.2. My Arabic is not good enough. :eek: In the first entry quoted, is Ibn Duraid دريد ابن the name of an author or the nickname of sugar-candy?
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    I can't answer the first question :) «how do people say sugar-candy" in Arabic?» because I don't know and this is the first time I learn this word. Thanks a million by the way, Sofia :)

    Ibn Duraid is a famous Arab author. When we say "qaalahu X", it means that X (in this sentence, Ibn Duraid) said the previously mentioned opinion.
     

    Qcumber

    Senior Member
    UK English
    cherine said:
    Ibn Duraid is a famous Arab author. When we say "qaalahu X", it means that X (in this sentence, Ibn Duraid) said the previously mentioned opinion.
    Thanks a lot, Cherine.
    so qaalahu X = so said X. Very useful.
     

    Qcumber

    Senior Member
    UK English
    SofiaB said:
    from lisan al arab [...] مَقْنُودٌ ومُقنَّدٌ أي معمول بالقَنْد
    I suppose 'ai أي means "that is to say / id est / i. e.".​
     

    MarcB

    Senior Member
    US English
    Qcumber said:
    Thank you for this confirmation, MarcB. This meaning is not in Hans WEHR that only translates this particle as "whatever, etc."
    It means: Hey,oh, any, which,i.e.
     

    Tisia

    Senior Member
    Iran, Persian, Kurdish, English, Finnish
    Heba said:
    ......The second part of the name- قند - means ''city'' in Persian.

    قند 'qand' is a Persian or Kurdish word and means 'sugar cube'. The 'sukkar qandi' might also mean 'sugar cube' in Arabic.

    As I read in the Arabic service of Wikipedia, Samar qand means 'the Face of Earth'. Samar qand is a Persian name but I cannot tell which one means Face and which one Earth.

    Regards
    Tisia
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top