summon a student

Sweetboat

Senior Member
Korean
Would you tell me which expressions are appropriate to use when summoning a student?

The situation is, when the teacher is in the staff room and she sees Harry(student) in there and she asks Harry to go to the classroom and find Ron(student) and tell him to go to see the teacher.

Ms. Shin : Oh, Harry. It's good you're here.
1) Could you get Ron?
2) Could you get Ron here?
2) Could you send Ron to me?
Harry : Sure.
(In the classroom)
Harry : Ron, Ms. Shin wants to see you. Go to her staff room.
Ron : Oh, have I done anything wrong? Why would she want to see me?
Harry : I don't know. She didn't tell. But she didn't look angry.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    1) Could you get Ron? :thumbsdown:
    2) Could you get Ron here? :thumbsdown:
    2) Could you send Ron to me? :thumbsdown:

    Could you please ask Ron to come and see me. :thumbsup:
    Could you please tell Ron I'd like to see him. :thumbsup:


    Harry : I don't know. She didn't tell. :thumbsdown:
    Harry : I don't know. She didn't say. :thumbsup:
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    (In the staff room)
    Ms Shin: Harry, I'm glad you're here. Will you get Ron to come to the staff room?
    Harry: Certainly!


    (In the classroom)
    Harry : Ron, Ms. Shin wants to see you in the staff room.
    Ron : Oh, have I done something wrong? Why does she want to see me?
    Harry : I don't know. She didn't say. She didn't look angry.
     

    Sweetboat

    Senior Member
    Korean
    (In the staff room)
    Ms Shin: Harry, I'm glad you're here. Will you get Ron to come to the staff room?
    Thank you very much. There are many ways to say this!
    It's embarrassing that I made so many awkward expressions here when I've been teaching English for such a long time.
    Well, I'll just keep trying to improve my English.
    Thank you again. :)
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Thank you very much. There are many ways to say this!
    It's embarrassing that I made so many awkward expressions here when I've been teaching English for such a long time.
    Well, I'll just keep trying to improve my English.
    Thank you again. :)
    Don't be too hard on yourself, Sweetboat. Your English is actually pretty good. My suggestion was just one of many ways to say this. Yours just needed a little tweaking, which heypresto has done very nicely. :)
     
    Last edited:

    Sweetboat

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Don't be too hard on yourself, Sweetboat. Your English is actually pretty good. My suggestion was just one of many ways to say this. Yours just needed a little tweaking, which heypresto has done very nicely. :)
    Thank you very much for your encouragement.
    I think I have to encourage my students a lot just like you did.
     

    Sweetboat

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I've come up with one more candidate : Could you call Ron to the staff room?

    Is this OK? If you directly translate the Korean sentence, it will look like this.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    In AE, the teacher would probably say "Would you go get Ron for me, please?" Both "please" and "for me" are optional. The "for me" is implied, and the "please" may be expressed by the previous sentence, tone of voice, etc.

    Sometimes AE speakers add "and": "Would you go and get Ron?" But it's not needed. "Go get Ron" clearly means "go to where Ron is, and bring him to me here".

    It's embarrassing that I made so many awkward expressions here when I've been teaching English for such a long time.
    Your written English is excellent. No-one is perfect. Using "tell" for "say" is a common mistake. The words are very similar, but used differently. A similar mistake involves using "get/fetch" with location words:

    2) Could you get Ron here? :cross:You can only "get Ron" where Ron is, which is not "here". "Get" does not mean "fetch".
    2a) Please get Ron (in/from classroom 103) and bring him here. :tick:
    2b) Could you fetch Ron here?:tick:Correct, but "fetch" is old-fashioned in AE.

    Could you get Ron for me? :tick:
    == Could you enable me to get Ron, by bringing him to me here?

    Could you go get Ron? :tick:
    == Could you go to where Ron is, "get" him (convince him to follow you), and bring him to me?
     

    Sweetboat

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you very much dojibear, for your kind words and more alternatives.
    Of them, I like "Could you get Ron for me?" the most.

    Can I also say "Could you call Ron to the staff room?" to mean the same thing? (Here, 'call' is not telephone calling.)
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    If you want him to yell loudly "HEY RON! COME HERE!"
    That's how they do it in Texas, all right!:):)

    call Ron to the staff room
    That is standard English, and in the WR dictionary definiton 2 of "call" is "summon". But the example is "Call a doctor, quick!" and this meaning of "call" seems to be a combination of "call out to (by telephone)" and "summon". So Myridon is right that it doesn't just mean "summon", and in a school would imply using an intercom.

    Both "summon" and this meaning of "call" are a little old-fashioned: nowadays we tend to use them for what people in authority like judges and princesses do. We don't have princesses in the US, but a judge might say:
    - Call the next witness to the witness stand.
    - Summon the jury to the courtroom.
     
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