Super and Superb

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gtoturbo69

Member
Russian
Hello there! Can anybody explain me what is the difference between super and superb and what context do they use in?
 
  • Aidanriley

    Senior Member
    English
    Super can mean "extremely" at times. It is super cold.
    It can also mean "high-quality", but in that case, superb is preferred, because "super" sounds a little bit childish.

    This food is superb. (Good)
    This food is super. (Good if you are a child, or if it is an informal situation).
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Are there any popular words to mean ”good“?
    There are many, many words to mean "good", depending on what you're talking about: food, grammar, music, sports, art, health, etc. etc. etc. Dozens. Hundreds.
     

    xuliang

    Senior Member
    Chinese Mandarin
    I would like to add that both words are very old-fashioned when used to mean "good". "Super" used as "extremely" is much more common.
    Hi, all, I would like to know, is it common now to describe a person who can do something very well with the word "super". If not, what words do native speakers usually say in this occasion?

    For example, in a TV program, a child or an adult can work out the complex maths during a very short time, then the host said: " You are super. " Or when a player has won the champions in competitions for several times , and we say "He is super"

    Is it common to say so? Thank you.
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    For example, in a TV program, a child or an adult can work out the complex maths during a very short time, then the host said: " You are super. " Is it common to say so? Thank you.
    I think it would be much more likely to say "That was super." referring to what the person just did. You would want to say "You are very good at maths." not "You are very good." so (very, very informally) "You are super good at maths."
     
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