superficie hors oeuvre pondérée (SHOP)

Prez

New Member
English
Can anyone help with the French abbreviation of ‘S.H.O.P’ in the real estate survey business? I know it stands for ‘superficie hors oeuvre pondérée’. The only translation I am coming across is ‘overall surface area’, but in French it is defined as less than that: only a useful area of a building (without the space taken up by walls, spaces lower than the standing height etc.). In my text the distinction is especially important since I have ‘Superficie totale’ and ‘SHOP’ next to one another, the SHOP surface being about two thirds of the total surface. This is why ‘overall surface area’ for ‘SHOP’ makes no sense to me, it seems the same as the total area.
 
  • Ellea1

    Senior Member
    Southern French
    Hello,

    I'm not good at abbreviations but I thought

    S H O P standed for surface habitable par personne lol

    What about

    weighted area??

    superficie hors oeuvre = gross floor area????
     
    Last edited:

    Prez

    New Member
    English
    It is in the description of individual buildings in an estate. SHOP relates to an individual building's surface area.
     

    Quaeitur

    Mod'elle
    French
    SHOP is a (strange) mathematical construct that does not correspond to a measurable area.

    SHOP is a weighed GEA (Gross External Area, which means: including wall thickness). To calculate it, you have to divide your building into various areas depending on their nature (attic with folding stairs, attic with fixed stairs, basement, areas with less than 1.8m headroom, etc.). Each area has a weight factor that depends on its nature, and that is determined by law (have a look at the official text, and the explanation for the text). The SHOP is calculated by adding the weighed areas. So there is no direct correlation between SHOP and the usually measured areas.
     
    Last edited:

    Prez

    New Member
    English
    Thanks, but how does that relate to the 'total surface area' which, in my text, is mostly by a third bigger than the S.H.O.P. area?
     

    Prez

    New Member
    English
    It can't be just the basement. For example, there is a 22-storey building with a total area of 25 thousand square metres, of which SHOP is 18 thousand square meters. In all the buildings I am dealing with in the translation SHOP is about 80 percent of the total area. So it is most of the total area.
    Thanks for the link, unfortunately I did not find anything there.
     

    Quaeitur

    Mod'elle
    French
    Your SHOP is smaller than your GEA because some of the areas in your building count for less than their actual measured area (their weigh factor is less than 1). That's what a weighed sum is all about ;)

    The weigh factors in the SHOP are set by the French government. Have a look at the links I posted earlier to get a clearer idea.
     

    Prez

    New Member
    English
    OK, thank you very much. I do not need to check the calculation but just to find the translation. Maybe I could get by by calling SHOP 'weighted surface area'?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top