supplementary classes in mathematics

apoziopeza

Senior Member
slovak
Hi,

Please advise, would you say "supplementary classes", "supplementary lessons" or "extensive teaching" in the underlined part? Or would you use other phrase?

It means that the students study various subjects (languages, sports, etc.) but mathematics, information technology, and natural sciences are witha more intensive focus (more hours per week than regular or basic class). That is why they acquire deeper knowledge than their peers in other classes.

Thanks,

A.

These studies follow the school educational program (pursuant to ISCED 3A) and involve supplementary classes in mathematics, information technology, and natural sciences with electives chosen in the third and fourth years. The school-leaver has thus acquired deeper knowledge and intellectual skills in the aforementioned core areas. The school-leaver has received full secondary general education, is prepared for university studies, and has acquired competencies that are key elements of lifelong learning.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Is the paragraph a quote (where is it from?) or is it something you have written?

    "Supplementary classes" means classes or lessons in addition to that usually provided. The question then arises, how is time found for these classes? Are other classes or subjects dropped to make room for them? Are students expected to attend classes outside of normal school hours, or at break times or in what would otherwise be free study periods?

    "Supplementary classes" and "Supplementary lessons" have much the same meaning. "Extensive teaching" doesn't convey the sense that there are additional lessons/classes, but that there are a lot of lessons/classes. In BrE, "lesson" and "class" mean the same thing in this context, and are used interchangeably.
     

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    Is the paragraph a quote (where is it from?) or is it something you have written?

    "Supplementary classes" means classes or lessons in addition to that usually provided. The question then arises, how is time found for these classes? Are other classes or subjects dropped to make room for them? Are students expected to attend classes outside of normal school hours, or at break times or in what would otherwise be free study periods?

    "Supplementary classes" and "Supplementary lessons" have much the same meaning. "Extensive teaching" doesn't convey the sense that there are additional lessons/classes, but that there are a lot of lessons/classes. In BrE, "lesson" and "class" mean the same thing in this context, and are used interchangeably.
    It is my translation of supplement to certificate.
    It looks that extensive teaching is what I mean. It lessons that studends of this particular class take as a rule, not additionally to something but compared to other classes/ schools they have more lessons. They have to attend the classes within normal hours, it is their choice that they have decided to study at this school to be more prepared for future university studies in e.g. maths or economics.

    I will try to explain it in different words
    Example.
    "extensive teaching" / specialized secondary school (with more hours): students have 50 hours per subject but 100 hours per math, 100 hours per information technology, 100 hours per natural sciences

    "Basic teaching" / standard secondary school:
    students have 50 hours per subject but 50 hours per math, 50 hours per information technology, 50 hours per natural sciences.

    Thanks.
     

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    It is my translation of supplement to certificate.
    It looks that extensive teaching is what I mean. It lessons that studends of this particular class take as a rule, not additionally to something but compared to other classes/ schools they have more lessons. They have to attend the classes within normal hours, it is their choice that they have decided to study at this school to be more prepared for future university studies in e.g. maths or economics.

    I will try to explain it in different words
    Example.
    "extensive teaching" / specialized secondary school (with more hours): students have 50 hours per subject but 100 hours per math, 100 hours per information technology, 100 hours per natural sciences

    "Basic teaching" / standard secondary school:
    students have 50 hours per subject but 50 hours per math, 50 hours per information technology, 50 hours per natural sciences.

    Thanks.
    Can I
    Augmented syllabuses is a possibility.

    Thanks.

    Is augmented syllabuses the only possibility or could I use something with the adjective "extensive"? Thank you very much.

    These studies follow the school educational program (pursuant to ISCED 3A) and involve augmented syllabuses in in mathematics, information technology, and natural sciences with electives chosen in the third and fourth years

    Please see, this is how this document looks like on page2, you can see that the subjects with extensive hours are in bold, there also have semiminars on these subjects (standardly use do not have these seminars, but because they study in this class they have more hours/lesson in these, all of them I understand are mandatory)

    Subject – number of hours of individual subjects for the entire studies – school language:
    Subject Number of hours per week Number of hours in total

    Slovak Language and Literature 12 384
    English Language 16 512
    Spanish language 12 384
    Physics 6 192
    Chemistry 6 192
    Biology 6 192
    Applied Experiments 4 128
    History 6 192
    Geography 4 128
    Civics 4 128
    Ethics 2 64
    Mathematics 13 416
    Information Technology 5 160
    Art and Culture 4 128
    Physical and Sports Education 8 256

    Seminar on Mathematics 4 128
    Seminar on Physics 2 64
    Seminar on Information Technology 4 128
    Seminar on Programming 2 64
    Economics 4 128
     

    cidertree

    Senior Member
    Béarla na hÉireann (Hiberno-English)
    Extensive is possible of course but, if the baseline is the basic teaching, you probably need a comparative form. - extended perhaps.
     

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    Extensive is possible of course but, if the baseline is the basic teaching, you probably need a comparative form. - extended perhaps.
    Thanks, would you collocate "extended" with teaching? Thanks.

    These studies follow the school educational program (pursuant to ISCED 3A) and involve extended teaching in in mathematics, information technology, and natural sciences with electives chosen in the third and fourth years
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In American English, I would understand "teaching" as the act of teaching (what a teacher does), but I get the idea from the above posts that in British English it can mean "the act of being taught" (what a student does).
     

    cidertree

    Senior Member
    Béarla na hÉireann (Hiberno-English)
    Thanks, would you collocate "extended" with teaching? Thanks.

    These studies follow the school educational program (pursuant to ISCED 3A) and involve extended teaching in in mathematics, information technology, and natural sciences with electives chosen in the third and fourth years
    I'm not sure that "extended teaching" conveys the concept of additional content.
     

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    In American English, I would understand "teaching" as the act of teaching (what a teacher does), but I get the idea from the above posts that in British English it can mean "the act of being taught" (what a student does).
    Teaching means what a teacher does, learning means what a student does. In this text it is written in Slovak with "extensive teaching" meaning that teachers provide more lessons/classes to students. But if we combine it with "studies" which is the first word - as it is made by a student - I would opt for replacing "teaching" with some other word meaning that these particular 3 subjects students are in more lessons per week.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Teaching means what a teacher does, learning means what a student does. In this text it is written in Slovak with "extensive teaching" meaning that teachers provide more lessons/classes to students. But if we combine it with "studies" which is the first word - as it is made by a student - I would opt for replacing "teaching" with some other word meaning that these particular 3 subjects students are in more lessons per week.
    What I mean to say is that in American English, "teaching" sounds like you need to teach the classes, not attend the classes. I think you are right to not choose the word "teaching" here. "Classes" will make sense to speakers of both British and American English.
     

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    What I mean to say is that in American English, "teaching" sounds like you need to teach the classes, not attend the classes. I think you are right to not choose the word "teaching" here. "Classes" will make sense to speakers of both British and American English.
    This is the final version, thanks:

    These studies follow the school educational program (pursuant to ISCED 3A) and involve extended classes in in mathematics, information technology, and natural sciences with electives chosen in the third and fourth years
     

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    I understand that extended and extensive are interchangeable here, so both versions could be used, is that right?
     

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    What is a "school-leaver?"
    A school-leaver is a student that has successfully completed studies at a secondary school (by passing the final exam).
    For universities we use graduates (I understand that the term "graduate" is used for universities only).

    This paragraph has a clumsy construction because the first sentence (which does not have a verb in Slovak) is only a description what the studies entail (for any students). (present tense) Then it follows with what the school-leaver has attained... (past tense).
     

    cidertree

    Senior Member
    Béarla na hÉireann (Hiberno-English)
    In your context, I'd read school-leaver in the same way but Merriam-Webster defines it as:
    "one who has left school usually after completing a course of study instead of continuing on to a college or university."*
     

    apoziopeza

    Senior Member
    slovak
    In your context, I'd read school-leaver in the same way but Merriam-Webster defines it as:
    "one who has left school usually after completing a course of study instead of continuing on to a college or university."*
    I need a word (school-leaver or graduate or something) to include both cases A) and B):
    A) "one who has left school usually after completing a course of study and does not wish to continue on a college or university (and wishes to have full-time work), or
    B) one who has left school usually after completing a course of study and wishes to continue on a college or university,
    [it may happen that even though this person wishes to continue on a university, does not pass the university entrance tests and is not accepted and has to go under category A)


    Thanks, A.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    In BrE, a school-leaver is a person who, between the ages of 16 and 19, leaves secondary school.

    It makes no difference whether or not they got any certificates or qualifications, nor whether they are going on to further study. Most university entrants are school-leavers, some might better be called college-leavers (depending on how education of 16 to 18 year olds is conducted where they live), but both groups contrast with mature students (who enter university over the age of 25 or so), and people whose route into university involved a period of work or something else, lasting at least a year.
     

    bandini

    Senior Member
    inglés gabacho
    In BrE, a school-leaver is a person who, between the ages of 16 and 19, leaves secondary school.

    It makes no difference whether or not they got any certificates or qualifications, nor whether they are going on to further study. Most university entrants are school-leavers, some might better be called college-leavers (depending on how education of 16 to 18 year olds is conducted where they live), but both groups contrast with mature students (who enter university over the age of 25 or so), and people whose route into university involved a period of work or something else, lasting at least a year.
    If you leave without completing, I think we use the term "dropout."
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If you leave without completing, I think we use the term "dropout."
    In the British school system, there's not really anything to complete. Once you get good enough scores on certain tests, you have the necessary qualifications for university or trade school or whatever. There's no "high school diploma" that you only get at the bitter end.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Legally in England and Wales, you need to attend school until at least the last Friday in June of the school year in which you reach the age of 16 (school years run from early September to early September, so a school leaver may only be 15 years and 9½ months old). When I was at school, I think the date was Easter for some children (perhaps depending on age). Certainly there were some who never reappeared after the end of the Spring term (which ends before Easter). Anyone who drops out before the legal leaving age is not a "school leaver" as such, but anyone who remains in school at least until that date becomes a school lever at the time they leave school, whether it is in that last Friday in June or two years later. Perhaps three years, in some cases.

    As Myridon says, there is nothing to complete, apart from ticking days off on a calendar.
     
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