suppress/subdue/stifle

GandalfMB

Senior Member
Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
Greetings,
First, I would like to ask you a question about subdue and stifle. Would it be acceptable to say: "She couldn't subdue/stifle the urge to run after him. I referred to a few dictionaries and it appeared that "subdue" could be used this way. Can "anger" be subdued as well?

The second question. I usually see and hear: "She suppressed a smile." I personally think that "stifle" could be used too. Can it?

Thank you
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Personally, I would say "she couldn't control/stifle the urge..." "Subdue" could be used, but it doesn't sound as natural to me.

    Anger can be "subdued." I would also suggest "suppress."

    Perhaps you can ask the second question in a new thread.
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    Personally, I would say "she couldn't control/stifle the urge..." "Subdue" could be used, but it doesn't sound as natural to me.

    Anger can be "subdued." I would also suggest "suppress."

    Perhaps you can ask the second question in a new thread.

    The urge can also be suppressed, can't it? I didn't say anything about it because I was pretty sure.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Oh...I have seen it used in various contexts. In collocation with "yawn/urge/snobs/etc". To stop yourself from showing how you feel. Is the dictionary wrong again?
    Not necessarily, no. You could "stifle" the urge to strangle somebody. :eek:
     

    GandalfMB

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian - Yellow Beach
    If stifle is used in reference to laughter and speech, do these sentences sound unnatural to you? Here they are: "She pressed her hand against her mouth to stifle her snobs.", "Stifling her impatience, she waited another half an hour.", "She managed to stifle a yawn." I copied all three of them off OALD.
     
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