Sure thing=welcome?

  • taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It just happens to be an expression that I, a conservative elderly speaker of BrE, do not use in that context.
    Aha :)
    But Dryan used this in my thread here post #22. I thought it's something like "welcome". Does it mean "you are welcome" there, please?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I don't think I've heard any BrE speaker say that as a response to 'thank you'. It sounds like an AmE expression only. I'd only use 'sure thing' to mean 'certainty' ('It is a sure thing that the sun will rise again tomorrow'.) In AmE it is also used to mean 'certainly' (as a response to a request) ('Can you pick up a loaf of bread later?' 'Sure thing.')
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It seems so.
    I don't think I've heard any BrE speaker say that as a response to 'thank you'. It sounds like an AmE expression only. I'd only use 'sure thing' to mean 'certainty' ('It is a sure thing that the sun will rise again tomorrow'.) In AmE it is also used to mean 'certainly' (as a response to a request) ('Can you pick up a loaf of bread later?' 'Sure thing.')
    Thank you both so much :)
    When I read that first, I thought it means "certainly" and I read my previous post again to see Dryan has said "certainly" in response to what :)
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It's just a casual alternative you might say to someone.
    Thank you again so much!
    To say that the favor done is small and undeserving of a formal exchange of pleasantries. There are many informal expressions like "Sure thing."
    Cross posted
    I think it's something like my help is a sure thing that this means that I certainly help whenever you want, right?
    Thank you very much!
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Why is "sure thing" used instead of "you are welcome", please?
    As pointed out above, it is a very informal alternative to "You're welcome."
    In AE, people use a variety of expressions to respond to "Thanks."
    Personally, I'd recommend sticking to "You're welcome."
    A lot of people find some of the casual alternatives annoying and even rude.
    This is particularly true of the casual alternative "No problem"when, for example, a person who is paid to do a certain job is thanked and then responds by saying, "No problem." I think the reasoning behind the annoyance is that there should be no problem at all because the person is, in fact, being paid to do what (s)he is being thanked for. "You're welcome" would be the more formal and gracious reply--and not at all at risk of annoying the "thanker."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I don't think it's a reference to the future. It's just about this situation. "You can be certain that I was happy to help you. (I wasn't pretending.)"
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I think it's something like my help is a sure thing that this means that I certainly help whenever you want, right?
    This sounds like a reasonable theory about what Sure thing means, taraa. The speakers who use sure thing or no problem probably haven't given much thought to their replies and what they might mean. Like Language Hound, I don't much like those replies. To me, they are a little too casual and dismissive to be appropriate replies to a courteous expression of thanks.
     
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