sure+to/to have

slovac

Senior Member
Could you please tell me whether TO BE SURE can be used in the sentences said by B and C?

A: I saw a ghost.
B: You are sure not to be serious.
C: You are sure to have had a hallucination.

Thank you
 
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  • romolasgarai

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Not really. "You are sure to do <something>", to me, may well be translated better as "You must have done <something>".

    e.g. "You must have had a hallucination."
     
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    slovac

    Senior Member
    Thank you. Does it mean that
    You are sure not to be serious. is not same as You must be joking
    You are sure to have had a hallucination is not same as You must have had a hallucination
    ?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Could you please tell me whether TO BE SURE can be used in the sentences said by B and C?

    A: I saw a ghost.
    B: You are sure not to be serious. :cross: You cannot be serious. :tick:
    C: You are sure to have had a hallucination. :cross: You must have had a hallucination. :tick:

    Thank you
    A: [At the railway station] "Ah, my train has arrived. I must get on board."
    B: "OK. Be sure to phone me when you get home." -> "Be certain that you phone me.../Ensure that you phone me.../Do not forget to phone me..."

    A: "Excuse me, I am lost. I am looking for a house called "Ash Grove". Do you know where it is?"
    B: "Yes. Go as far as the church and turn left. It is the only house with a red roof in that road, you are sure to see it." -> You are certain to see it; You cannot fail to see it; I know that you will see it.

    A: "My uncle will arrive in a few moments. You are sure to like him, he is a very funny man. He makes everyone laugh." You are certain to like him; I know that you will like him; I promise you will like him.
     

    slovac

    Senior Member
    Thank you PaulQ. After your explanation, I created a sentence and would like to ask you to tell me whether SURE can be used in that sentence:
    A: I saw a ghost.
    B: Do not talk about it. People are sure to make fun of you. (I am sure/know people will make fun of you)

    Can I have an another question?
    A: "Excuse me, I am lost. I am looking for a house called "Ash Grove". Do you know where it is?"
    B: "Yes. Go as far as the church and turn left. It is the only house with a red roof in that road, you are sure to see it." -> You are certain to .
    Is using the passive form of the bold part possible?
    The house's roof has been painted red to be sure to be seen.
    Or an easier construction which seems to me a bit clumsy:
    The house is sure to be seen.
     
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    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The house's roof has been painted red so as to be sure to be seen. :tick: OK, but a bit clumsy.
    The house's roof has been painted red so that it is sure to be seen.
    :tick: This sounds natural.
    Or an easier construction which seems to me a bit clumsy:
    The house is sure to be seen. :tick: This is not clumsy at all. It is fine. "The house is sure to be seen: it has a red roof."
     
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