surplusage

Mnemon

Senior Member
Persian - Pārsi
a mall with a surplusage of stores all selling the same lines of clothing.
Definition of surplusage
1 : surplus sense 1a
2a : excessive or nonessential matter
b : matter introduced in legal pleading which is not necessary or relevant to the case
Merriam Webster

Actually, the term is new on me. Do you normally use the terms <surplus><surplusage> interchangeably? I'd like to know your opinion about the given sentence and definition. I kind of like the noun, Surplusage. :)
Any thought.
 
  • anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I glanced at that word and my mind saw "slurp sausage."

    Not the most flattering introduction to this word, which I am here seeing for the first time. Maybe in some industry contexts "surplusage" could be used, but I would always use the word "surplus."
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Do you normally use the terms <surplus><surplusage> interchangeably?
    I have never used, heard, read or otherwise encountered "surplusage" and neither have I any intention to either use it in the future or suggest to others that they do so.
    [My apologies for the surplus sausage]
     
    Last edited:

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I have never seen this word in use and don't see the utility of it. Is this an ancient legal terms creeping back into general usage? There are lots of archaic words in English that have French Norman roots. vassalage comes to mind.

    And while we're at it, I say "no" to any further neologisms like surplusagization or surplusaguity or surplusagize.

    English is wonderful because you can do all these games with nouns into adjectuives into verbs. It makes English flexible. But it doesn't mean you should!
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    <surplus><surplusage>
    There was a tendency in earlier English to add "-age" to nouns and verbs to give the impression of the amount as an independent whole.

    This was not the only use of "-age": The OED comments on the suffix "-age" - you will note some have survived well, others withered on the vine -
    The suffix "-age"is was used to form nouns denoting
    1.something belonging or functionally related to what is denoted by the first element (and sometimes denoting the whole of a functional apparatus collectively), as leafage n., luggage n., roomage n., signage n., vaultage n., etc.
    2. the function, sphere of action, condition, etc., associated with a person's occupation, office, or situation, as orphanage n., porterage n.1, pupillage n., umpirage n., etc.
    3. a charge, tax, or duty levied on what is denoted by the first element, as ballastage n., housage n., poundage n.1, rowage n., etc.
    and 4. Forming nouns derived from verbs, denoting an action or the result of an action, as breakage n.1, brewage n., cleavage n., narratage n., spillage n., steerage n., wreckage n., etc.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    In one specific job, in one specific industry, people might have a need for 2 words meaning "surplus". If so, they might use "surplusage" in some situations.

    But I'm guessing. I've never heard or read "surplusage".
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    There was a tendency in earlier English to add "-age" to nouns and verbs to give the impression of the amount as an independent whole.

    This was not the only use of "-age": The OED comments on the suffix "-age" - you will note some have survived well, others withered on the vine -
    Ok really interesting. Hadn't thought of it being hidden in plain sight in all those normal words!

    I was indeed thinking of early modern and feudal taxes probably as mentioned in passing in 19th century novels. Maybe Trollope parodying some archaic legal documents of the landed gentry.

    Socage. What is socage? Off to Google

    Socage - Wikipedia
     

    Mnemon

    Senior Member
    Persian - Pārsi
    Thank you <folks> for the comments.
    This was not the only use of "-age": The OED comments on the suffix "-age" - you will note some have survived well, others withered on the vine -
    The suffix "-age"is was used to form nouns denoting
    1.something belonging or functionally related to what is denoted by the first element (and sometimes denoting the whole of a functional apparatus collectively), as leafage n., luggage n., roomage n., signage n., vaultage n., etc.
    2. the function, sphere of action, condition, etc., associated with a person's occupation, office, or situation, as orphanage n., porterage n.1, pupillage n., umpirage n., etc.
    3. a charge, tax, or duty levied on what is denoted by the first element, as ballastage n., housage n., poundage n.1, rowage n., etc.
    and 4. Forming nouns derived from verbs, denoting an action or the result of an action, as breakage n.1, brewage n., cleavage n., narratage n., spillage n., steerage n., wreckage n., etc.
    Interesting :thumbsup:
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    I remember 15 or 20 years ago a brief fad of attaching -age to nouns that didn't usually have that ending: I don't remember any specifically, but they were along the lines of
    "There's a lot of roofage on that house" said of a house with many gables and porches.
    or
    "I have to rake the leafage before it snows" said of a lawn with many fallen leaves on it in autumn.
     
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